The Targeting of the Witham Family in GLENS FALLS NY

The Agenda 21  Mafia of  NEW  York

Stealing and Controlling Lands in America has been a Crime Spree that spans more than 500 Years.   The  Land Rustlers are a  FILTHY BREED.   JBW

THE SWAMP  ….  East Shores Harbor …. The Witham Marina

1VBEQ00010099 - 29-APR-65 - CROP - Harris Bay

WITHAM FAMILY BUILT

BEFORE

Targeted and Robbed by the EMPIRE State ….. The More and More and More and MoreLAND Racketeering of NEW York and Da Boiz …the original 550,000 Acre State Conservation Area EXPLODES 1000% to more than SIX MILLION ACRES ….. Albany’s SWAMP Exposed

adirondack-defenders-abolish-the-apa

See  The  CANTONS of  Switzerland  and the  SWISS  Bank Accounts of Glens Falls

The Collective Socialist Communism of Environmental Confiscation NYS DEC / APA / ADK

NOTICE  IMMEDIATELY AFTER MY FATHER AND MOTHER WERE ROBBED AND  DAD HAD DIED

conservancytargeted2

 

Andy

Adirondacks The Collectivists Communal Socialism

The AGENDA 21 / Agenda 2050 Fabianism Commune-Ity https://theadirondacksconspiracy.wordpress.com/adirondacks-a-collectivism-of-greed/

YOUTUBE.COM

Oh Look  a  STATE  TREASURE  MAP  What are the Chances

park

 

ReesPlane

 

OUR / OUR’s  Who  is  They and WHY is it THEIR’s ?????

The  VAST  Communization of the  Commune-Ity of  NEW  England Immaginable  THE SOCIALISTS   AGENDA 

ANewState

More and More and More and MoreLAND  EXPOSED

SEE  CANTONS  Of The NEW York  EMPIRE ….   YES  The  CANTON  NEW  York  Systems

 THE   GREEN NAZIS  TARGET  LAND  AND LAND OWNERS  ….  Just  The  FACTS

Note   ”  DEC   Had amassed a very large nvestigative Dossier on My Parents at the Colonie  DEC  Headquarters    IMAGINE THAT   NYS  Conservation Dept.  /  DEC was  Tracking My Parents in the 1960s 

See  The  CANTONS of  Switzerland  and the  SWISS  Bank Accounts of Glens Falls

The  Communist  CANTONAL   Forests of  ZURICH

The Albany Corporation Patroons and  Glens Falls  Banksters    REVEALED 

WithamFamilyMarina2

The  TARGETED   Witham Marina  at   the  EAST SHORES  HARBOUR

wastegates2

Actual History Reveals  a  Massive  Artificial Flooding of the  Lake George Basin by the  Damned Dam Operators  at  WEEDVILLE  at  Dam  “A” 

conservancytargeted2

The Whole  East Side Marsh is  ARTIFICIALLY   Submerged on account of  the  Ticonderoga Dam

5000Flood

The GLEN ISLAND  GAUGE   ” Gives It Away “

GaugeChartLakeGeorge

A  Fascinating   REAL  LOOK  at  the  REAL  HISTORY  of  the  MILL POND  /    LAKE GEORGE

The  Mill Pond Dam of the Glen’s Falls  BANKSTERS flooded  Northern Queensbury on a Massive Scale  …..   See   Lake George  The Damned Dam Truth

a8feet

COMMUNIST NEW YORK …  You Betcha

5000Flood

The VAST Flooding of the Lake George MILL POND by the  Glens Falls Mills and Banks with NEW York State acting in Concert and Conspiracy.

ArtificialWetland

 

Howard'sPark

ADK and the  Wilderness Society

They LOVE  THE WORD  TARGET

The  So Called   Environmentalists /   Conservationists    Exploded a 550,000 Acre  New York  Conservation Area  by  1000%     BY   Targeting   Landowners   …..  They Love the Words    TARGETING  of  LANDS

Landowner Consideration of Conservation Easement Utilization in the …

by MJ Nowak – ‎2012 – ‎Cited by 1 – ‎Related articles

Private, non-commercial Adirondack Park landowners with a residence on their property …. and represents an important factor when targeting potential grantors.

Targetting Lands and Land Owners NYS DEC / APA and the Nature …

Adirondack BLUE LINE Mobsters The Miner 46ers DEC … in 323 BC was more than a land … New York State Targets Lands and Land Owners for Aquisition.

Adirondack Landowners’ Association – Statistics

… of the Adirondacks in the 21st Century that targeted selected private land holdings for … “Membership in the Adirondack Landowners Association is open to …

NY voters to decide on 2 Adirondack land swaps

Oct 16, 2013 – Two Adirondack land swaps are being proposed to voters in November: one … which involves 216 private and public landowners in the hamlet of … Conservation has recommended that the state Legislature target the historic …

[PDF]Town of Brighton Smart Growth Plan – New York State Department of …

Jul 9, 2009 – The New York State Adirondack Park Community Smart Growth Grant Program …… major focus of town center revitalization, and the target area for …. land ownership and management, water resources, water resources …

[PDF]West Central Adirondacks Housing Needs Assessment – CAP-21

cap-21.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Housing-Needs-Assessment-June-1012.pdf

owners has driven up the cost of all housing in the Adirondacks (and in other …. Each of the Town’s in the West Central Adirondack Target Area has vacant land.

[PDF]Input-Output Modeling of Protected Landscapes: The Adirondack Park

pure.iiasa.ac.at/…/Input-output%20modeling%20of%20protected%20landscapes%20T…

by K Hubacek – ‎2002 – ‎Cited by 13 – ‎Related articles

Abstract: Change in ownership of large land resources in the northeastern United … ments are found to have the most potential to meet target objectives without.

PROTECT calls on the Adirondack Park Agency to uphold the Wild …

Jul 8, 2015 – Community Connector Trail UMP Amendments Threaten Quality of Life of PrivateLandowners Whose Lands are Targeted by Major New …

 

GreenNazi2

The  HEART of  COMMUNAL  FORESTRY –  Europe and Britain

See  The  CANTONS of  Switzerland  and the  SWISS  Bank Accounts of Glens Falls

adkmapsm1891

The CANTONAL   Communal Forest of the  EMPIRE  State

MAP

Map of the Adirondack Forest and adjoining territoryScale ca. 1:126,720. Cover title: Adirondack map, 1909. Relief shown by shading. Cadastral map showing public lands and adjacent private land ownership. Inset: Railroad and county map of northern New York. Available also through the Library of Congress Web site as a raster image. AACR2: 650/1; 650/2; 710/2; 710/3

  • Contributor: Wood, M. O. – Smith, Glenn Shepard – Matthews-Northrup Company – New York (State). Forest, Fish, and Game Commission
  • Date: 1909

SwampFoxNews

The  Hidden  Secret History of the  Conservation Conspiracies  REVEALED 

The GRAND  MONARCHY  and the  ROYAL’s   SCAM  The NEW  England  COLONIES

SEE  CANTONS  Of The NEW York  EMPIRE ….   YES  The  CANTON  NEW  York  Systems

See    1876 map of the Adirondacks, showing many of the now obsolete names for many of the peaks, lakes, and commune- ities

Seems  Colvins and Emmons  were  BRITISH  Agents ….  Oh My 

Banksters

The Commission on the future of the Adirondacks in the 21st Agenda EXPOSED

https://www.facebook.com/Harris-Bay-Lake-George-NY-Witham-…/

CAN YOU SAY COMMUNAL FORESTS …. EVERYTHING IS RIGGED IN THE SWAMP … THE BIG BAD BANK and the Rothschilds / Hochschilds / Zahniser Rockefellers Set Up https://books.google.com/books… SEE ALSOhttps://www.google.com/search…

The  Ancient  ROYAL  background of  the  Pinko  Park  /    Forst  Reserve /   Deer Park  of  ROYAL  DESIGN

The Colvins are a family of ancient English lineage, the first appearance of the name in English history occurring in the old chronicles, wherein it is stated that Colvin, Duke of Col-Chester, or Kaer-Colvin (“Col-chester” equivalent to “Colvin-town”), became King of Britain and rejected the authority of the Roman Emperor. The Roman general, Constantius, being sent against him with an army, a truce was made and Constantius married Helen Colvin, daughter of the king. The son of this union was Constantine, afterwards Emperor of Rome, and called “The Great,” who was the first Christian emperor.* [* See ancient English Chronicles of Britain (Grafton, 1568, p 86-87-88-89), and Peter Heylyn’s great “Cosmographi,” Kings of Britain, p. 273.] His mother, Helen, was the Saint Helena, of the ancient Catholic Church, so honored as the discoverer at Jerusalem of the remains of the “true cross” on which the Savior died, which facts may be found more fully brought out in Geoffrey’s [i.e., Geoffrey of Monmouth] British History, chapter vi., Grafton’s Chronicles; Heylyn Chronicles, p. 273.

John , Andrew  and VerPlank Colvin  the  Grand  Perpetrators  of  New York’s   FABIAN SOCIALIST /   COMMUNAL  /    ROYAL  Racket and Scam

except ….  Ariaantje Coeymans, wife of David Verplanck, was the daughter of Barent Pieterse Coeymans, who purchased the enormous tract bearing his name. He was the son of Pieter Coeymans, also a miller, the progenitor of his family in America, who came from Utrecht in 1636, and he married the daughter of Andries De Vos. Barent, first owner of the mill at Coeymans, had litigation with the Patroon Van Rensselaer, because he had dealings before the Patroon with the native Indians for the tract of land measuring ten or twelve miles along the Hudson river. It was decided in Coeymans’ favor in 1714, and he obtained a patent from Queen Anne confirming the entire tract to him. Upon a commanding site, near the Hudson river, was erected the old stone mansion, the oldest building in the place, and still an object of great interest, once called the “Coeymans’ Castle.”

 

The  Royals and  Extraction Agenda of the Colvins and Emmons … The Story of  Beaverwick and Albany Corporation is a window into America Subverted

GOOD  OLE   RPI  University

College of  the  PATROONS

PDF]ABOUT THE EXHIBITION NATURAL HISTORY AND ENVIRONMENT

In 1820, Amos Eaton, a botanist, geologist and co-founder of Rensselaer Polytechnic … Eaton’s student, Ebenezer Emmons, a geologist and medical doctor, … Albany explorer Verplanck Colvin to lead a multi-year survey of the Adirondack region. … the Adirondacks and his first success came on May 15, 1885, when the NY.

Collections Search Results – Albany Institute of History and Art

http://www.albanyinstitute.org › Collections › Collections Database

Albany Institute for History and Art … Attributed to David Augur (1) · Attributed to Ebenezer Emmons(1821-1908) (2) ….. Albany-area resident or merchant (1) · Verplanck Colvin (1847-1920) (1) · Willem Hoffmeyer (1) … Attributed to Killiaen Van Rensselaer, III (1663-1719), AlbanyNY (1) · Attributed to L. Marcotte & Co.

See  the  Adirondacks  a  Royal Hustle

Queen  Anne  DID NOT   Own  the  Land  is  the  problem

Oh and  the  ROYAL’s  are all COUSINS  You Can’t Make THIS CRAP UP

ComunistForests2

Natural Resources Council of America

The Natural Resources Council of America was founded in 1946 [1] and is today dedicated to networking and partnerships among environmental groups and corporations. Most of its events are closed to members except for its gala annual awards dinner held each year in Washington, DC.

According to its website, “In any successful partnership, the goals of all parties are mutually valued and achieved. The Council’s work with corporate, foundation, government, and individual contributors has established a network that all parties rely upon to maximize the effectiveness of their message to the collective conservation audience. … For more detailed information on each program, please peruse the site. Some areas of the site are password protected for our members-you may use the username ‘guest’ and password ‘welcome’ to access these areas of the site. [2]

HUNTING AND STALKING PROPERTY OWNERS SINCE 1946  For Their Natural Resources

Howard Zahniser: Author of the Wilderness Act  ….  Wilderness Means Property That is NOT Their’s

Howard Zahniser was born on February 25, 1906, in Franklin, Pennsylvania. The son of a Free Methodist minister who changed churches every few years, he grew up in the Allegheny River region of northwestern Pennsylvania. He spent his teenage years in Tionesta, just west of what is now the Allegheny National Forest. It was here that he developed a life-long interest in nature and a love of literature. He attended Greenville College in Illinois where he received a degree in humanities. He taught school and worked as a newspaper reporter.

Black and white portrait of Howard Zahniser wearing a wide-brimmed hat. More about this picture plus a quote in the inset below.

 

WHO ARE THEY ?  AND WHY IT IT Our’s (   Their’s  )

Zahniser wrote the first draft of the Act in 1956. An eloquent wordsmith, he chose the word “untrammeled” to characterize wilderness in the Act. Others questioned this choice, yet he was adamant about its use as the right word to characterize wilderness.

“A wilderness…is hereby recognized as an area where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man…”

The Wilderness Act.

Beginning in 1930, Zahniser was employed by the U.S. Department of Commerce and soon the USDA Bureau of Biological Survey (which would several years later become the core agency of the new USDI Fish & Wildlife Service). He worked for 12 years for the Fish & Wildlife Service in the information division where he honed his interests in nature, influenced by the likes of Ira Gabrielson and Edward Preble, as well as doing his own research, writing, and editing. He worked at writing press releases, speeches for agency directors, radio scripts for the National Farm and Home Hour (in which he sometimes appeared himself). In 1942, after the start of World War II, the Fish & Wildlife Service was relocated to Chicago, but Zahniser found work in the USDA Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils, and Agricultural Engineering. He worked as the director of the Bureau’s information and editorial division.

During this time as a federal employee, he contributed articles and essays to scholarly and scientific journals relating to the conservation/environmental movement. Zahniser’s ideas about ecosystems and wilderness were influenced heavily by Harold Anderson, Harvey Broome, Bernard Frank, Aldo LeopoldBenton MacKayeBob MarshallErnest OberholtzerOlaus Johan Murie and Robert Sterling Yard, who were driving forces behind the fledgling wilderness movement and the formation of The Wilderness Society (founded in 1936). In 1945, Murie became director of The Wilderness Society in Moose, Wyoming, and at approximately the same time, Zahniser left the federal government and became the executive secretary of the organization in Washington, D.C. Murie and Zahniser led the organization and built a broad basis for support. Both were pivotal in the passage of the Wilderness Act of 1964.

Black and white portrait of Howard Zahinser wearing a long coat and carrying a small suitcase and books. More about this picture plus a quote in the inset below.

 

In the late 1950’s, Howard Zahniser convinced a Georgetown tailor to custom-make a coat with four supersized inside pockets in which he would keep books, wilderness bill propaganda, Wilderness Society membership information and applications and other items.

I believe that at least in the present phase of our civilization we have a profound, a fundamental need for areas of wilderness – a need that is not only recreational and spiritual but also educational and scientific, and withal essential to a true understanding of ourselves, our culture, our own natures, and our place in all nature.

This need is for areas of the earth within which we stand without our mechanisms that make us immediate masters over our environment – areas of wild nature in which we sense ourselves to be, what in fact I believe we are, dependent members of an interdependent community of living creatures that together derive their existence from the Sun.

By very definition this wilderness is a need. The idea of wilderness as an area without man’s influence is man’s own concept. Its values are human values. Its preservation is a purpose that arises out of man’s own sense of his fundamental needs.

Howard Zahniser, The Need for Wilderness Areas

In the 1910s and 1920s, there were several proponents of wilderness. Three men are considered pivotal in these early years and all were Forest Service employees: Aldo Leopold, Arthur Carhart, and Bob Marshall. Their efforts were successful at the local level in creating administratively designated wilderness protection for several areas across the country beginning in 1924 with the designation of the Gila Wilderness on the Gila National Forest. At the national level, there was a series of policy decisions (L 20 and U Regulations) that made wilderness and primitive area designation relatively easy, but what was lacking was a common standard of management across the country for these areas. Also, since these wilderness and primitive areas were administratively designated, the next chief or regional forester could “undesignate” any of the areas with the stroke of a pen. This situation was considered to be unacceptable by Zahniser and others.

Zahniser became the primary leader in a movement to have Congress designate wilderness areas, rather than the federal agencies. In the late 1940s and early 1950s, he led conservationists of the era to successfully fight the Echo Park Dam. This was a Bureau of Reclamation proposal in 1949, to build a substantial hydroelectric project in Dinosaur National Monument as part of the Upper Colorado River Storage Project. The dam fight came to symbolize the nation’s endangered parks and wildernesses. Zahniser served as a representative of conservation interests in negotiations with the government, and the issue was finally resolved in 1955 with no dam being built. With the support he had garnered from the conservation community during the dam fight, he went on to be an important leader in the campaign for federal wilderness legislation in the 1950s and early 1960s.

Olaus Murie, Howard Zahniser and Adolph Murie stand in front of an Alaskan mountain range. More about this picture plus a quote in the inset below.

WHO ARE THEY ? 

AND WHY IT IT Our’s (  Their’s  )

Olaus Murie, Howard Zahniser and Adolph Murie (left to right) on Cathedral Mountain in what is now Denali National Park.

“Let’s try to be done with a wilderness preservation program made up of a sequence of overlapping emergencies, threats and defense campaigns! Let’s make a conserted effort for a positive program that will establish an enduring system of areas where we can be at peace and not forever feel that the wilderness is a battleground.”

– Howard Zahniser, “How Much Can We Afford to Lose?,” in Wildlands in Our Civilization (San Francisco: Sierra Club, 1964): 51.

This address was also printed in the Sierra Club Bullitin (April 1951).

In 1946, proposed legislation for a Federal Wildlands Project articulating the vision of Benton MacKaye, then president of The Wilderness Society, was circulated, though it was never introduced into Congress. The lack of support for this proposed legislation showed Zahniser that substantial national support would be needed to achieve wilderness legislation. By 1949, Zahniser had a detailed idea for federal wilderness legislation in which Congress would establish a national wilderness system, prohibit incompatible uses, identify appropriate areas, list potential new areas, and authorize a commission to recommend changes to the program. It was not until after the Legislative Reference Bureau report on wilderness was published legitimizing concern for wilderness and the Echo Park Dam fight united the conservation community, however, that the first wilderness bill would be drafted.

In 1955, Zahniser began an effort to convince skeptics and Congress to support a bill to establish a national wilderness preservation system. Drafts of a bill were circulated the next year and introduced in Congress by Rep. John P. Saylor (R-PA). He sought to rally public opinion through writing in The Living Wilderness and other publications as well as organizing many talks to citizens groups across the country. By the late 1950s it seemed that the wilderness bill would eventually become law, but there were many legislative battles still to be fought. At the same time, the Multiple Use, Sustained Yield Act(MUSY) was also being pushed through Congress. Some have said that the MUSY was strongly supported by the Forest Service to counteract the wilderness legislation, and after passage of MUSY in 1960 there were many who felt that there was no need for a separate wilderness bill since wilderness was one of the many multiple uses allowed in the act.

Hubert H. Humphrey (D-MN) became a major supporter of the bill, but state water agencies, mining, timber, and agricultural interests were very much opposed. Also, the Forest Service and the National Park Service both initially opposed the bill not wanting to give up administrative control. The wilderness bill, which was stalled for several years in Congress, finally came out of committee with a compromise to allow mining in national forest wildernesses until 1984.

Howard Zahniser’s son Ed recalled, at a national wilderness conference in 2000, that on Saturdays, it was his father’s job to take the four children out of the house for “Zahnie’s Rational Spousal Preservation System,” and take them for hikes along the C&O Canal or to the National Mall museums and art galleries. He recounted that some of the Saturdays were devoted to Capital Hill visits where the four children could be found distributing Wilderness Act pamphlets to remaining members of Congress. Ed said, “We four kids could talk wilderness first hand…Did our squeaky-voiced squadron of Saturday lobbyists turn a heart or two? Who knows?” Ed, a conservationist in his own right, shares other insights about his father in “Preserving Wilderness and Wildness as Enlarging the Boundaries of the Community.

Ironically, Howard Zahniser who pushed so hard for the act died on May 5, 1964, just a few months before the bill became the law of the land. Doug Scott, policy director of Campaign for America’s Wilderness recalled Howard’s last days. “Zahnie [as he was affectionately known] wasn’t there to see it [the wilderness bill]…Just two days after testifying at [the final congressional hearing], Zahnie died at the age of 58…But, his widow, Alice, and the incomparable Mardy Murie stood at Lyndon Johnson’s side when the wilderness law was passed.” President Lyndon Johnson signed the bill into law on September 3, 1964. The act designed 9.1 million acres of wilderness in the new National Wilderness Preservation System, most of these coming from the national forests. Because of Zahniser’s relentless efforts, he has often been called the “Father of the Wilderness Act.”

A team of Forest Service wilderness managers met soon afterward in Washington D.C. to come up with implementing regulations for these new congressionally established wildernesses. What was felt to be an easy task eventually took many months as they sought consistent ways to manage the existing wildernesses. Part of the Wilderness Act of 1964 also set up procedures to evaluate existing primitive and roadless areas for possible inclusion into the wilderness system. For the next 20 years the roadless areas reviews (RARE and RARE II) would play an important and controversial role in Forest Service management of the national forests.

From September 1945 to May 1964, Zahniser served as executive secretary of The Wilderness Society, editor of its journal The Living Wilderness, and later executive director. In addition to Zahniser’s role in The Wilderness Society-and the passage of the Wilderness Act of 1964–he played important roles in other conservation and environmental groups from the mid-1940s until his death. He wrote extensively for the Nature Magazine, where he contributed a monthly book review column from 1935 until 1960; organized the Natural Resources Council of America in 1946 (he served as the chairman 1948-49); served on the Secretary of the Interior’s Advisory Committee on Conservation from 1951 to 1954; and was honorary vice-president of the Sierra Club after 1952, vice-chairman of the Citizen’s Committee for Natural Resources in 1955, and president of the Thoreau Society for the 1956-1957 term. He was awarded the honorary Doctor of Letters (Litt. D) degree by Greenville College in 1957.

References
Allin, Craig Willard. 1982. The Politics of Wilderness Preservation. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

Baldwin, Donald Nicholas. 1972. The Quiet Revolution: Grass Roots of Today’s Preservation Movement. Boulder, CO: Pruett Publishing Co.

Bay, Crandall. 1983. “Zahniser, Howard Clinton (1906-1964).” Pp. 741-742 in Richard C. Davis (ed.) Encyclopedia of American Forest and Conservation History. Volume 2. New York, NY: Macmillan Publishing Company.

Codispoti, Amy. 2000. “An American Wilderness Vision.” Journal of the National Wilderness Conference, 6-7.

Davis, Richard C. 1983a. “Wilderness Preservation.” Pp. 693-701 in Richard C. Davis (ed.) Encyclopedia of American Forest and Conservation History. Volume 2. New York, NY: Macmillan Publishing Company.

Davis, Richard C. 1983b. “Wilderness Society.” Pp. 701-702 in Richard C. Davis (ed.) Encyclopedia of American Forest and Conservation History. Volume 2. New York, NY: Macmillan Publishing Company.

Harvey, Mark W.T. 1998. “Howard Zahniser: A Legacy of Wilderness.” Wild Earth, Vol. 8, #2 (Summer): 62-66.

McCloskey, Michael. 1966. “The Wilderness Act of 1964: Its Background and Meaning.” Oregon Law Review, Vol. 45, #4 (June): 288-321.

Nash, Roderick. 1963. “The American Wilderness in Historical Perspective.” Forest History, Vol. 6, #4 (Winter): 2-13.

Nash, Roderick. 1968. Wilderness and American Mind . New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

Roth, Dennis. 1995. The Wilderness Movement and the National Forests. 2nd edition. College Station, TX: Intaglio Press.

Zahniser, Edward. 1984. “Howard Zahniser: Father of the Wilderness Act.” National Parks, Vol. 58, #1/2 (Jan/Feb): 12-14.

Zahniser, Edward. 1992. Where Wilderness Preservation Began: Adirondack Writings of Howard Zahniser. Utica, NY: North Country Books.

Zahniser, Howard Clinton. 1947. “The Wilderness Society: What it is, Does, and Hopes to Accomplish.” Journal of Forestry, Vol. 45, #1 (Jan): 33-35.

Zahniser, Howard Clinton. 1953. “Wilderness in a Multiple Use Forestry Program.” Pp. 171-173 in Proceedings of the Fourth American Forest Congress, 1953. Washington, DC: American Forestry Association.

Zahniser, Howard Clinton. 1956. “The Need for Wilderness Areas.” Land & Water, Vol. 2 (Spring): 15-19.

Zahniser, Howard Clinton. 1957. “The Wilderness Bill and Foresters: An Address by Wilderness Enthusiast…Before Washington Section SAF [Society of American Foresters].” American Forests, Vol. 63, #7 (July): 6, 51-54.

Zahniser, Howard Clinton. 1959. “The Case for Wilderness Preservation Legislation.” Pp. 104-110 in Proceedings: Society of American Foresters Meeting, 1958. Washington, DC: Society of American Foresters.

Zahniser, Howard Clinton. 1963. “Wildlands, a Part of Man’s Environment.” Pp. 346-354 in A Place to Live, The Yearbook of Agriculture, 1963. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Zahniser, Howard Clinton. 1964. “The People and Wilderness.” The Living Wilderness, Vol. 86 (Spring-Summer): 39, 41-42.

adirondack-defenders-abolish-the-apa

Preserving Wilderness and Wildness as Enlarging the Boundaries of the Commune- ity

ComunistForests

WHO ARE THEY ?  AND WHY IT IT Our’s (   Their’s  )

By Ed Zahniser, son of Howard Zahniser

Howard Zahniser, or ‘Zahnie’ as he was known to friends and associates, grew up largely off the money economy and so did not get eye glasses until well into his youth. With their aid he discovered that the world had sharper edges and even greater natural beauty than he had previously imagined. A public school teacher introduced him to birdwatching and inspired a lifelong fascination that no doubt attracted him to his eventual work in conservation.

Another public school teacher required her pupils to memorize a quotation from Ralph Waldo Emerson each week. She would point at you, my father said, and say “Emerson says!” You were supposed to snap back with the Concord Transcendentalist sage’s quote for that week. Birds and Transcendentalism: with the metaphysical humility of his religious upbringing these (and later mentors) sufficed to point Zahnie toward concern for preserving wildness.

Zahnie’s important mentors after he went to Washington, D.C. in the 1930s were the naturalist Edward A. Preble, mammalogist Olaus J. Murie, and nature editor Richard Westwood. It was for Westwood, no doubt with support from Preble, that Zahnie wrote his monthly book review column, in essay format, “Nature In Print,” in Nature Magazine for 25 years. These 12-yearly essays kept Zahnie abreast of contemporary nature writing and allowed him to dip into the rich legacy of past writing about natural values. This reservoir of knowledge served him well not just as a writer but as a lobbyist and champion of wilderness and wildness.

Not a little of Zahnie’s writing in the wilderness bill years from 1955 to his death in 1964 was composed in his head as he would sit in our living room in front of the amplifier listening to recorded classical music after dinner. Perhaps he was also soaking in another ambience of that room; against one wall was a large, five-unit glass-front bookcase that held his 2,000 books of poetry and drama. He was a bibliophile, which is Greek for ‘book junkie.’

As a young kid I got free books from two secondhand book dealers in Washington, D.C. They thus secured my innocent complicity so my father could browse undisturbed. When I was in high school, we regularly went to the Riverdale Bookshop, a secondhand bookstore within walking distance of our home in Hyattsville, Md., on Wednesday evenings. “Are you ready to go to prayer meeting?” my father would ask after our Wednesday dinner.

The outer walls of our first- and second-floor hallways were lined with floor-to-ceiling bookcases, whose contents doubled as insulation, lacking in the walls themselves. Zahnie’s book collecting centered on three main areas: natural history and conservation, art, and literature. My father’s main literary mentors were the Hebrew scriptures’ Book of Job, Italian poet Dante Alighieri, English engraver and poet William Blake, and Henry Thoreau. These were Zahnie’s mentors not only as a writer but as a humanist conservation thinker, too.

Around the time the wilderness bill was introduced, my father found an older tailor, E. ‘Sye’ Silas, in Georgetown who custom-made suits for about the same price as off-the-rack suits. My father convinced Mr. Silas to make him suits whose coats featured four supersized inside pockets. These became veritable fabric filing cabinets that usually held wilderness bill propaganda, Wilderness Society membership information and applications, a book by Thoreau, and another book by either Dante or Blake. Most conservationists and their organizations were poor then, so my father read these while riding trolley cars and buses, not taxi cabs, to appointments around the Nation’s Capital. Some of his books still hold transit transfer coupon bookmarks.

The Wilderness Act is often cited as an unusually poetic piece of legislation. An article in the April 6, 2004 U.S. News and World Report magazine for example, says its language “tiptoes as close to poetry as legalese ever comes.” Zahnie’s lifelong immersion in the Job material, Dante, Blake, and Thoreau inform both the language and spirt of the Act. These are thinkers who held overweening Reason and unquestioned Progress suspect and who imagined their worlds anew.

Zahnie delighted in word play, one of his most oft-used tools of humor. During the wilderness bill years my sister Karen’s Teddy bear became variously known as ‘Wilderness Bill’ or ‘Gladly the Cross-eyed Bear.’ The first moniker is self-evident. The second nickname parodies the evangelical Christian gospel song ‘Gladly the Cross I’d Bear.’

When Zahnie began to edit and produce The Living Wilderness magazine in 1944, his very broad, humanist conception of conservation soon manifested in the “News Items of Special Interest” section he introduced in the March 1946 issue. Through this extensive section Zahnie and The Wilderness Society began to reach out to any and all groups and causes sympathetic to a broadly construed conservation ethic. The many bridges to other groups first built through the magazine’s news section eventually helped fashion the first national conservation coalition, which would defeat the Echo Park dam proposal in 1955 and then launch the campaign for a Wilderness Act.

In these “News Items” appear Thoreau Society efforts to save Walden Pond from untoward development and the varied conservation concerns of national and state Women’s Clubs and Garden Clubs. These latter two women’s groups would supply a great deal of the political muscle and letter writing support that defeated the powerfully backed Echo Park dam proposal and that won the campaign for the 1964 Wilderness Act. Zahnie served as president of the Thoreau Society for the 1956-57 term. I find it characteristic of the inclusive humanism that underlay his conservation ethic that he invited as guest speaker for the 1956 annual meeting of the Thoreau Society not a conservationist, per se, but an Indian diplomat. Mr. Mehta, as I recall his name, was asked to talk about Thoreau’s influence on Mahatma Mohandas Gandhi and the nonviolent resistance that freed India from British rule.

My feeling is that the bedrock of my father’s commitment to a broadly construed conservation, and his assertion that the natural world, its wildness and wilderness, must be valued for itself as well as for humans, lay in his grasp of metaphysical humility. This need for sensing dependence and interdependence as well as independence is most clearly expressed in Zahnie’s 1955 essay “The Need for Wilderness Areas.” He asserts there that we prosper only as the whole community of life on Earth that derives its sustenance from the Sun prospers. Zahnie came by this urgent sense of our need for humility as a species genetically, from his parents and their religious commitment.

Although he did not end up espousing all the doctrinal views they stood for, Zahnie’s view of life was essentially religious. When I was in junior high and high school, he and I sometimes would go to the National Episcopal Cathedral in Washington, D.C. on Sunday mornings. There we might attend two or three services; the cathedral’s several chapels accommodated ethnic Christian groups, on a given Sunday. His religious sense was as broadly ecumenical for its day as the News section of The Living Wilderness was broadly conservationist for its time.

In a sense, with the Wilderness Act Howard Zahniser forged a national legislative program and wilderness preservation system out of Aldo Leopold’s keen sense that we humans need to enlarge the boundaries of our ethical community, to include the land. And for Leopold ‘the land’ signaled the entire biota and all its interpenetrating dynamisms that support it and us. Zahnie labored to draw such a larger circle, to include wilderness and the wildness it protects. He was willing to talk to anyone for as long as it might take to help them come to see that this was, in fact, the right thing to do. As Olaus Murie once remarked, “Zahnie has unusual tenacity in lost causes.” With patience that could be a winning trait.

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See https://books.google.com/books?id=WdYoDAAAQBAJ&pg=PA176…Manage

Many Voices, One Vision: The Early Years of the World Heritage Convention

BOOKS.GOOGLE.COM.PE

The  NEWBIE  GREENS  of  the  Fabian Socialist  COMMUNAL  Forests  Cabal of New York.  They just had to  HAVE and CONTROL  the   Fake, Artificially Flooded Man Made Swamps of EAST LAKE GEORGE

ANewState

 

 

The  FABIAN  SOCIALISTS of  NEW York’s  Communist EMPIRE STATE

The  MAN MADE FAKE ARTIFICIAL WETLANDS  of  East  Lake George

conservancytargeted2

The VAST  MAN CAUSED FLOODING  OF  THE  ARTIFICIAL MARSHES

HarrisBayFlooded

The above areas are PART of the more than 5,000 Acres  ARTIFICIALLY Flooded by the  Paper Companies, Mills and Steam Ship Interests on Lake George in the 1800s

DAMNEDDAM

MillPond

glens-falls-messenger-april-9-1829

The  VAST  MAN MADE FLOODING Created the  Artificial  Marshes

WithamFamilyMarina2

Back to the Adirondacks | The Nature Conservancy

The largest Adirondacks program land acquisition in 100 years is featured in this … to the state for preservation, the Conservancy had to get 27 towns on board.

Missing: ad ‎hoc

[DOC]adirondack mountain club, chapter – The North Jersey Ramapo Chapter

C. To support efforts to acquire additional public lands and conservation …. The Chapter’s committees shall include standing committees and ad hoc committees.

[PDF]National Park Proposal – Adirondack Park Agency

… by an ad hoc committee as a matter believed to be worthy of public consid- eration. … ed. Mn a min. Pi. Mk. II-. :1. T0. RS .um. Mm. rlI m“ rh. Inn-r! rn. “I! Mm. Ill-l. n. .wk .0 pica! Ad … The name arouses thoughts of conservation battles to preserve this … that after more than Bil years of land acquisitionwithin the au— thoriaed …

State Buys Vanderbilts’ Adirondack Camp – The New York Times

Oct 7, 1975 – But the acquisition has created a major problem that is causing great concern … and an ad hoc committee of private citizens and organizations has been set up in … issue of 1972, which allocated $44‐million to purchase lands in the Adirondacks … for the State Department of EnvironmentalConservation.

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8 FEET  HIGHER Than It would be  NATURALLY

Selected National and International Environmental Groups with
Headquarters in New York State

Amanaka’a Amazon Network, New York, NY
American Society for the Protection of Nature in Israel, New York, NY
American Nature Study Society, Homer NY
Association of State Wetland Managers, Berne, NY
Atlantic States Legal Foundation, Syracuse NY
Camp Fire Club of America, Chappaqua, NY
Center for Environmental Education, Valhalla, NY
Center for Environmental Information, Rochester, NY
Dragonfly Society of the Americas, Binghamton, NY
Environmental Defense Fund, New York, NY
Fund For Animals, New York, NY
Girl Scouts of the USA, New York, NY
Garden Club of America, New York, NY
Great Lakes United, Buffalo NY
Green Party USA, Blodgett Mills, NY
INFORM Inc., New York, NY
Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, NY
League of Women Voters Committee on the Environment, Chappaqua, NY
Marine Environmental Research Institute, New York, NY
National Audubon Society, New York, NY
Natural Resources Defense Council, New York, NY
Planned Parenthood Federation of America, New York, NY
Population Communications International, New York, NY
Property Rights Foundation of America, Stony Creek NY
5
Rainforest Alliance, New York, NY
Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, NY
World Environment Center, New York, NY
World Parks Endowment, New York, NY

Sources: The Environment Encyclopedia and Directory, Europa Publications Limited, London, 1994;

National Wildlife Federation, Conservation Directory,
45th Edition, National Wildlife Federation, Vienna, Virginia, 2000.

As in 1900, environmental affairs in New York is mostly the story of well-educated city dwellers insisting on changes that have the greatest impact on rural residents. Like a century ago, the political support for environmental reform is based on popular interpretations of scientific research, interpretations that are sometimes incomplete or wrong. But unlike 1900, environmental organizations are now found in every corner of New York, and officials in the most rural townships are now required to consider the environmental impacts of their actions.

Every year, hundreds of New York organizations, from the World Environment Center (in Manhattan) to the Chautauqua County Environmental Management Council (in Jamestown) create boxes upon boxes of records. Every year, hundreds of state and local laws are passed on behalf of New York’s environment, and each new law is preceded by a trail of documents. The following essay is intended to be a guide to the ideas that underlie New York’s vast infrastructure for environmental protection . Think of it as a map for those who want to find their way through the wilderness of environmental records.

See   http://www.archives.nysed.gov/common/archives/files/mr_pub72.pdf

[PDF]Celebrating 20 Years of Park Protection – Adirondack Council

gional zoning; permanent funding for conservation land, and importantly, has worked effectively with local …. comprehensive plan for land acquisition in the Adirondack. Park. ….. Gains seat on Governor’sAd Hoc Committee on. Overflights …

New York Forester – Volumes 21-25 – Page 25 – Google Books Result

1964 – ‎Forests and forestry

Under Article 7 Section 7 thereof the Commission may acquire, sponsor or … soil conservation, prevent and control erosion, and promote land reclamation and sound … “Adirondack Mountains National Park” , prepared by an ad hoc committee …

50 Years of Forest Preserve Purchases and Classifications – – The …

Feb 27, 2018 – The Temporary Study Commission followed on the work of the … Committee on Natural Resources, as well as the Conservation Department … Illustration: Public land in the Adirondacks in1973 (courtesy AdirondackAtlas.org).

Glens Falls Post Star Newspaper Archives, May 9, 1974, p. 21

May 9, 1974 – Read Glens Falls Post Star Newspaper Archives, May 9, 1974, p. … through eventual conveyance by the Adirondack Conservancy Committee.

[PDF]Celebrating 20 Years of Park Protection – Adirondack Council

Club Foundation, Adirondack ConservancyAdirondack Foundation and Hawkeye …. its photographs of the lands to joint Legislative Committee …. where the Council helped to While society has changed a great deal since 1973, the laws.

Apperson & Schaefer Timeline – Schaffer Library Union College

Start of the Logging Era in the Adirondacks. … The non-profit National Conservation Commission is established. …. 1974. Schaefer organizes the Couch-sa-chra-ga Association to publicize “Of Rivers and Men” and develop further films about …

[PDF]the adirondack park agency collection – St. Lawrence University

A. Temporary State Commission on the future of the Adirondacks. Containers 1-6. 1. … Land Acquistion, State of New York Conservation Department, 1968. 370 pp. 1. 5 …… uses and development in the Park, November 8, 1974. “Conceptual …

These Are the  SOCIALIST  PINKOS  That Targeted My Family. and STOLE Our Lands

adirondack-defenders-abolish-the-apa

The ORIGINAL PARK Protected in 1892  was 550,000 Acres    NOT   6,000,000 +  Acres

The 6 Million Acre  GREEN  SCAM

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AdkPk1892

Historical Note:

The Adirondack Mountain Club, popularly known as “the ADK” was founded in 1922 as an organization for people interested in promoting conservation, recreation, and education in the Adirondack Mountain region of New York State. It has since grown substantially from 208 charter members to over 20,000 members enrolled at large and in one of many chapters situated throughout New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania.

GRABBING  NATURAL RESOURCES   …..   SOCIALISTS

The idea of forming the ADK was conceived by Meade C. Dobson, who was then an official of the New York State Association of Real Estate Boards as well as the Palisades Interstate Park Trail Conference. He believed there was need for a private organization that could help the State develop trails and shelters which would make remote areas of the Adirondacks better accessible to hikers and backpackers. Encouraged by the initial support of his idea from George D. Pratt, Conservation Commissioner of New York State, and William G. Howard, Superintendent of Forests, Dobson invited other like-minded individuals to a special pre-organization meeting held on December 5, 1921, at the Log Cabin atop Abercrombie & Fitch sporting goods store in New York City. From the 40 people present, an organization committee was formed, including representatives of outing, recreational, educational, government, and business interests. In addition, they formed a Charter Membership Committee.

Plans were quickly formulated and on April 3, 1922, 75 of the 208 certified charter members attended the formal organization meeting at the A & F Log Cabin. They proceeded to organize the club by electing executive officers and a board of governors, and adopting the constitution and bylaws. Within two weeks a certificate of incorporation was filed with the New York State Government, that was officially granted April 25, 1922. Among the stated objectives in the Certificate of Incorporation was to develop and maintain trails; to construct and maintain campsites, open shelters (lean-tos), and permanent camps, maintain a bureau of information about the Adirondacks, publish maps and guidebooks, and educate the public regarding the conservation of natural resources and prevention of forest fires.

In October 1922, ADK held a general business meeting at the Lake Placid Club, in which the main item on the agenda was a motion presented at the April Meeting by Warwick Carpenter regarding Mountain slope protection and recreational development. To deal with the motion, a conservation committee was formed with Henry S. Graves, Dean of Yale Forestry School, as chairman. The committee presented a report rejecting the Carpenter proposal as being too specific as to areas to be acquired. The Executive Committee approved the conservation committee’s rejection, which was subsequently endorsed by the majority of members. Also, at this meeting the club formally recognized the establishment of local chapters at Albany and New York City. In January 1923, ADK held its first annual meeting in which the membership received reports submitted by the club officers, committees, and local chapters. The election officers and governors also took place.

In its early years when there were few trails, ADK supplemented the work of the New York State Conservation Department by clearing and marking 140 miles of trails. This included the Northville-Lake Placid Trail, a task completed within two years, which traverses the Adirondack Mountains from north to south for more than 130 miles. The trail is now maintained by the state. Other trails and shelters were built in the high peaks region leading out from the Johns Brook Valley to the Great Range and Mount Marcy. The club maintains a portion of these trails including part of the scenic Range Trail and those over Big Slide Mountain. Trail work continues today under special contract with the New York Department of Environmental Conservation and the enlistment of volunteers from local chapters and members-at-large. The ADK Trails Committee, originally known as Trails, Camps, and Shelters, has coordinated these activities from the very beginning.

In the field of conservation, the club has had an established policy since 1928, that has advocated recreational use and development of the Adirondack Park in proper balance with the “Forever Wild” provisions of the State Constitution. Through the years, the ADK Conservation Committee has pursued this policy objective by actively lobbying in Albany for sound conservation legislation. In 1931, the club supported the Hewett amendment which enlarged the Adirondack Park and permitted the State to protect Forest lands outside the Park. When rampant commercialization threatened the region as a result of the Winter Olympics, pamphlets were distributed by ADK to help defeat the Porter-Brereton Recreation Amendment in 1932. Later in the decade, the club strongly supported the retention of the “Forever Wild” provision in the revised New York State Constitution, crafted by special convention in 1938. The 1940’s began with a spirited debate between club members who supported, and those against the Whiteface Ski Trail Amendment. In October 1945, the club convened a Conservation Forum to establish a plan of action regarding anticipated postwar growth in recreation and other uses that could greatly effect the wild character of the Adirondack Park. This was also the beginning of almost a decade long struggle to defeat the proposed Moose River Reservoir-Panther Dam proposal and amendments related to recreational development, mining, and lumbering interests. Highway construction also became a major concern of the club, especially proposed road through the Indian Pass Wilderness and in 1958-1959, the proposed route of the Adirondack Northway. During the 1960’s, the club was once again in the forefront of efforts not to have constitutional guarantees weakened at the 1967 Convention as well as supporting the Conservation Bill of Rights Legislation. Proposals to create an Adirondack National Park and the Gooley Dam Project on the Hudson River were rejected by the ADK. In recent decades, the ADK has been supportive of and constantly working for the improvement of the State Land Master Plan and related administrative activities of the Adirondack Park Agency. The club has also taken interest in federal legislation such as the clean air and water acts, the wild and scenic river project, and wildlife protection measures.

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Recreational opportunities have been available to the club’s members from the very beginning. Annual weekend outings are held each Spring, usually in the Catskill and Autumn at Keene Valley. An extended outing program began in 1958 with a special trip to the Canadian Rockies. Since, ADK has sponsored trips to western United States, Canada, and other parts of the world. Each chapter also has their own outing programs. Winter recreation programs have been promoted by ADK since mid-1930’s when it created the Winter Activities Committee to serve members interested in snowshoeing and cross-country skiing. Since 1948, badges have been awarded to individuals and groups showing outstanding accomplishments in winter mountaineering. In 1954, a five day Winter Mountaineering School was begun that offers training sessions on snowshoeing, ski touring, ice climbing, and rescue techniques as well as lectures on safety. This program has been jointly administered since 1974 with the Appalachian Mountain Club. A special beginners weekend school has been offered since the early 1980’s. The Winter Activities Committee was renamed Outdoor Activities Committee during the 1960’s with the establishment of rock climbing and canoeing programs. During the 1970’s the boom in hiking and backpacking activities led to the creation of the Ridge Runner Program starting in 1974, when three individuals were hired to patrol the main trails giving advise, information, and occasional warnings regarding proper conduct in wilderness. This was a pilot program that was eventually assumed by the DEC’s rangers.

The ADK has enhanced its recreational programs through the ownership and operation of two mountain lodges. Adirondack Loj, situated on Heart Lake near Lake Placid, was leased by the club for many years beginning in 1932. It was purchased outright in 1958 and substantially renovated in 1962-1963 including the construction of an annex that provided kitchen and rest room facilities. A shelter for hikers and backpackers was built on the grounds during the mid-1970’s. Johns Brook Lodge, situated 3 ” miles by foot trail from Keene Valley, was constructed by the club, 1924-1925 as a base camp for hiking and climbing in the High Peaks region. It too has undergone renovations over the years. Cabins and lean-tos are also situated on ADK lands surrounding the lodge.

Publishing has been a principle ADK function from almost the very beginning. Its first major venture was a 4-8 page newsletter issued periodically beginning in November 1922, known as High Spots. This publication was expanded to a 20+ page quarterly magazine in 1930 that offered feature articles on hiking, camping, conservation, nature, history, and literature as well as club news. After 1937, High Spots became an annual yearbook before it was phased out after the 1944 issue. Meanwhile, the ADK Bulletin, a new bimonthly periodical emerged in 1937 that originally consisted of 10-12 pages of news about club activities, events, and policies. In 1945, it was renamed The Ad-i-ron-dac with an expanded format that included feature articles. The present title Adirondac first appeared in 1962 along with increased issuance to ten per year. It was reduced to six issues per year in 1990.

Another significant publication project began in 1934, when a pocket guide to trails of the high peaks region was released. This was the first in a series that now covers the entire Adirondack Park. These guides have been revised and updated several times. In conjunction with the guidebooks, ADK published special trail maps. In addition, ADK has provided a map marking service that annotates U.S.G.S. topographic maps. During the 1950’s, the first editionof the Adirondack Bibliography was released, which too has been revised several times.

The educational function of ADK has not been so much a separate entity, but rather a major aspect of its policies and programs in conservation, recreation, and publications. Conservation is enhanced by public information campaigns that have generated popular support for maintaining constitutional and statutory protection of the Adirondack Park and other wilderness areas in New York State. Recreation has been enhanced by schools and workshops on activities such as backpacking, bicycle touring, canoeing, rock climbing, and snowshoeing. In addition, ADK has published several brochures on wilderness customs and safety. Since the 1960’s, education has been furthered by Ranger-Naturalist programs held at Adirondack Loj during the summer. It includes seminars on subjects such as flora, fauna, ecology, and geology.

Governance of ADK has been accomplished chiefly by the Executive Officers and the Board of Governors. The executive officers now consist of the president, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd vice presidents, secretary, treasurer, and executive director, all of which are elective post except the latter two. The executive director is appointed by the Board of Governors to serve as the chief administrative officer of the club’s main headquarters. It evolved from part-time clerical position created circa 1928, called the executive secretary. In 1956, it became a full-time job with managerial responsibilities and given the present title in 1972. The administrative offices are presently housed in a building it owns situated near Lake George, New York. For many years, the club operated out of rental office space or the homes of its executive secretary. In 1973, the former Friends Meeting House in Glens Falls was purchased by the club for its headquarters and was maintained until 1990, when the club moved to a new facility near Lake George.

In closing this section, the intent here was only to provide a brief overview of the ADK club history in regards the organization’s principle activities and functions. Comprehensive histories are available in special anniversary issues of the Adirondac: November 1972 and November 1982.

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Scope and Contents Note:

The archives of the Adirondack Mountain Club (ADK) document the activities and function of the organization from its inception to the present. It is comprised mostly of records created by the main organization, but also includes records created by some of its semi-autonomous local chapters. Arrangement of these records is according to principle activities and functions or form of material. There are eleven series:

  1. Organizational,
  2. Correspondence,
  3. Administration and Financial,
  4. ADK Foundation,
  5. Lodges,
  6. Conservation,
  7. Trails and Recreation,
  8. Education and Publishing,
  9. Chapter Reports and Newsletters,
  10. Publications, and
  11. Local Chapter Records.

The organizational series consist of a variety of material relating to club history and its governing and administrative structure. Included are files containing the proceedings of the organization and charter membership committees, December 1921-April 1922, the minutes of the organization meeting, April 3, 1922; certificate of incorporation, April 25, 1922, first constitution and bylaws, and charter membership roster. Also included are subsequent printed revision of the constitution and bylaws and membership rosters which were frequently combined. The second subseries consist of minutes, programs, and other materials related to the first general meeting of October 1922, and subsequent annual meetings. Some of the reports that were originally appended to the minutes are now filed with the committee records. Minutes of the Board of Governors comprised the third subseries, that chronicle the action taken on all business set forth on the agenda. The decisions made by the Board of Governors are important because the body is empowered to determine all policies and programs of the club with the exception of amending the constitution and bylaws. The forth subseries consist of the Treasurer’s Reports or Financial Statements that provide a summary all of the club’s income and expenditures.

The correspondence series consist mostly of letters generated by the executive director, officers, and members of the Board of Governors, regarding policies, programs, and administrative matters. It reveals much about the important role the club leaders have in formulating policies, setting the agenda for business meetings, and defining committee tasks. Personal thoughts and opinions are also present in many letters which suggest there has been some diversity of views and perspectives among ADK leaders. The arrangement scheme here begins with all club correspondence filed together as one unit from the 1920’s through the mid-1950’s. Thereafter the general correspondence files concern business of the committees and the Board of Governors. The executive director files (1954-1975) are related primarily to administrative matters. It is arranged alphabetically from 1954 thru 1965, and chronologically thereafter. Also included here are specially designated files containing correspondence of club officers. These files are distinguished from other subseries here in that they were created specifically by the executive director. The ADK President correspondence relates to the activities and functions of that office. There are several gaps here as not all past presidents have relinquished their ADK related files. Lastly, there are files generated by the ADK Treasurer.

The Administration and Finance Series is comprised chiefly of records created by the following committees: Constitution and Bylaws, Membership, Nominating, and Finance. The Constitution and Bylaws committee files include correspondence, memoranda, reports, and other materials regarding proposed amendments and various revisions of the ADK Constitution and bylaws that have taken place through the years. Membership Committee materials concern application procedures, statistical tabulations and analysis, and preparation of membership rosters. Nominating committee files contain reports, correspondence, ballot forms, that reveal much about the clubs process for choosing candidates for officer and governor positions. Finance Committee (formerly Budget) files document the budget and financial planning process of the club. In addition, there are materials related to internal audits of ADK programs and the treasurer’s books. Other files in this series were generated by various special (ad-hoc) committees such as Archives, Fundraising, Long Range Planning, Memorials, and Personnel. Lastly, this series includes files of the executive director, regarding the club headquarters, bank accounts, insurance policies, and office procedures. Altogether, this series documents primarily the internal operations of the ADK.

The Adirondack Mountain Club Foundation record (1972-1980) series documents the activities and functions of a special semi-autonomous organization established to handle tax exempt income and expenditures. These records include organization documents, minutes of ADKF Board meetings, and correspondence, and financial reports. Also included are files related to grant projects considered by ADKF, such as ADK headquarters purchase (1973), Ridger Runner Program (1972-1973), search and rescue operations, (1974-1975), and Ton-Du-Lay litigation fund (1974-1975).

The Lodge Series consist of records related primarily to the administrative and financial operations of Adirondack Loj and Johns Brook Lodge. It includes minutes, reports, and correspondence of separate operations committees established for the two properties that are responsible for general operating policies and procedures. Other than correspondence of the managers (formerly caretakers). There is not much information here concerning daily on-site operations. Special material regarding Adirondack Loj include copies of the purchase Agreement between ADK and Lake Placid Club (1958), floor plans (ca. 1928), and building contract, specifications, and blueprints of the Annex and other renovations (1962), and the campers and hikers building (1973). John Brook Lodge files include cadastral maps of the property (ca. 1924), deeds to property purchased or donated to ADK (1924-1929), building committee proceedings (1924-1925), and special mortgage fund subscription records (1925-1930). Also included is material on Camp Grace (1956-1958) and application proceedings regarding the construction of a crew quarters building (1976). Other files in this series relate to both properties such as the future of Lodges Committee (Ad-hoc) that revised operation committee charters, the scenic easements proposals (1976), and environmental assessment and impact studies conducted in 1988-1989.

The Conservation Series documents the formation of the ADK conservation policy and its extensive involvement in lobbying and other advocacy programs. It includes annual reports, minutes, resolutions, special bulletins, and subject files of the Conservation Committee. These files reveal much about the formulation of the club’s position on most legislative and governmental policies and programs related to the Adirondack Park and other wilderness areas in New York State. Also included here are files of the Wilderness Committee (1973-1979), the ad hoc Committee on ADK’s relationship with other Conservation Organizations, and ADK participation in APA Goals Program.

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The Trails and Recreation Series includes records of Committees on Trails, Outings, and Outdoor Activities, and special programs such as the Ridge Runner, Rock Climbing School, and Winter Mountaineering School. Trails Committee files relate to trail construction, marking, and maintenance activities. It includes specific material in building the Northville-Lake Placid Trail (1923-1924), New York State Trail Conference (1935), Trail Booster Program (1978-1919), and Trail Crews Program (1983-1984). Outings Committee materials relate to the planning, publicity, and evaluation of programs held in the Spring and Fall as well as extended trips. Outdoor Activities Committee records relate mostly to its early efforts to promote winter recreation opportunities. It includes proceedings of the New York State Conference on Skiing (1936); correspondence, reports, and photo-essays relating to the Vee-Badge Award Program (1948-1952), and the Winter Mountaineering Manuals. Ridge Runner Program Files concern application procedures, candidate selection, work assignments, and other administrative matters. In addition, diaries of Jac Lyn Burke, ridge runner in 1977 are included here that contain notes and comments on her experiences. Winter Mountaineering School files contain correspondence, memoranda, reports, etc. relate to curriculum, instruction materials, application procedures, finances, and other administrative matters. In addition, there is considerable information regarding the move during the 1970’s to administer the school jointly with the Appalachian Mountain Club. Other files in this series relate to the Rock Climbing School, the Mount Marcy 1st ascent centennial (1937), Bicycle Routes Committee (1977-1978), High Peaks Advisory Committee (1975-1977), and the Search and Rescue Committee (1971-1977).

The Education and Publishing Series consists of records generated by various committees and programs concerning these activiites. The Publications Committee includes material related to printing, distribution, sales, inventories, and copyright. Map and Guidebook Committee Files include notes, data, and other descriptive information compiled by A.T. Shorey, Orra Phelps and others for the first edition of the Guide to Adirondack Trails, that was published in 1934. Adirondack Magazine Committee Files contain information on editing, advertising, subscriptions, printing, and distribution.

The Files of the Education Committee (formerly Public Information-Education) relate to its work with other ADK Committees, local chapters, schools, outdoor clubs, and other organizations in planning and developing seminars, workshops, and other special presentations. They also include press releases, and other material regarding contacts with print and broadcast media. Lastly, the series includes the records of the Natural History Committee, and special committees on the ADK 50th Anniversary (1972) and Forest Preserve Centennial (1985).

The ADK Chapter Reports and Newsletter Series consist of records submitted to the officers and governors by each local chapter. These materials provide information on chapter activities and programs.

The Publications Series is comprised of books, periodicals, calendars, and other materials published by ADK. It includes almost every issue of High Spots (1922-1937), ADK Bulletin (1936-1944), and Adirondac (1945-1991). Some of these issues are photocopies of the originals. Also, included are many editions of the ADK trail guide series, The Adirondack Bibliography, and many other books.

The Chapter Record Series is comprised of records generated by activities and functions of local chapters. Currently, records have been received from Adirondack Loj, Glens Falls, and Albany. Adirondack Loj Chapter records (1959-1968) include minutes of business meetings, monthly reports, and correspondence. Glens Falls Chapter records consist mostly of minutes, reports, resolutions, and other materials related to business meetings. Albany Chapter records consist of photocopies of all its major proceedings from 1922 to the present. They include the minutes of annual membership meetings, and executive committee meetings; reports of the treasurer and various committees.

Altogether the records of the Adirondack Mountain Club are an invaluable source of documents relating to the growth and development of conservation and recreational interests in the Adirondack Park in the Twentieth Century. In addition, they will also be very useful for current policymakers and leaders within ADK who would be interested in precedents for the policies they debate and enact.

Series Outline

  1. Organizational (Boxes 1-10)
    History
    Pre-organization Committee Material, 1921-1922
    Organization Meeting Proceedings, 1922
    Incorporation Papers, 1922
    Constitution and Bylaws, 1922-1929
    Membership Rosters, 1922-1972
    Annual Meeting Minutes and Programs, 1922-1979
    Minutes of the Board of Governors, 1922-
    Treasurer’s Reports, 1922-1978
  2. Correspondence (Boxes 11-46)
    General, 1922-1969
    Executive Director, 1954-1975
    ADK President, 1952-1975
    ADK Treasurer, 1967-1972
  3. Administration and Finance (Boxes 47-64)
    Constitution and Bylaws Committee, 1925-1977
    Membership Committee, 1972-1989
    Nominating Committee, 1936-1982
    Finance Committee, 1952-1987
  4. ADK Foundation (Boxes 65-68)
  5. Lodges (Boxes 69-82)
    Adirondack Loj, 1958-1988
    Johns Brock Lodge, 1923-1988
  6. Conservation (Boxes 83-90)
    Conservation Committee, 1922-1988
    Wilderness Committee, 1973-1979
    Relationship w/other Conservation Organizations, 1976-1978
    APA Goals Program, 1982-1983
  7. Trails and Recreation (Boxes 91-103)
    Trails Committee, 1923-1989
    Outings Committee, 1926-1989
    Outdoor Activities Committee, 1934-1982
    Rock Climbing School, 1965-1970; 1977-1982
    Ridge Runner Program, 1973-1979
    Winter Mountaineering School, 1961-1990
    Search and Rescue, Committee, 1971-1977
  8. Education and Publishing (Boxes 104-122)
    Publications Committee, 1922-1989
    Map and Guidebook Committee, 1922-1976
    Bibliography Committee, 1948-1973
    Adirondac Magazine Committee, 1956-1989
    Public Information-Education Committee, 1923-1980
    Education Committee, 1980-1988
    Natural History Committee, 1964-1988
    ADK 50th, 1972
    Forest Preserve Centennial, 1985
  9. Chapter Reports and Newsletters (Boxes 123-130) (alphabetical by Chapter)
  10. Publications (Boxes 123-145, 153-158)
    High Spots, 1922-1937
    ADK Bulletin, 1937-1944
    Adirondac, 1945-1991
    Cloudsplitter, 1938-1988
  11. Chapter Records (Boxes 146-152)
    Adirondack Loj, 1959-1968
    Glens Falls, 1950-1980
    Albany, 1922-1995

 

Box Folder(s) Description of Contents
1 1 ADK History
2 Brochures, 1922-1925
3 Brochures, ca. 1930’s-1980’s
4 ADK Club Emblems
5 Organization Committee Proceedings, 1921-1922
6 Charter Membership Committee, 1921-1922
7-8 Organization Meeting Minutes, April 3, 1922
9 Certificate of Incorporation, April 25, 1922
10 Constitution and Bylaws (1st), 1922
11 Charter Membership Roster, 1922
12 Membership Roster, 1927
13 Membership Roster, 1929
14 Constitution and Bylaws, 1930
15 Membership Roster, 1931
16 Membership Roster, 1935
17 Constitution and Bylaws/Membership Roster, 1938
18 Membership Roster, 1939
19 Membership Roster, 1940
20 Constitution and Bylaws/Membership Roster, 1942
21 Constitution and Bylaws/Membership Roster, 1947
22 Constitution and Bylaws/Membership Roster, 1949
23 Membership Roster, 1950
24 Membership Roster, 1952
25 Membership Roster, 1954
26 Constitution and Bylaws, 1956
27 Constitution and Bylaws/Membership Roster, 1960
28 Constitution and Bylaws/Membership Roster, 1965
29 Membership Roster, 1968
30 Constitution and Bylaws, 1970
31 Constitution and Bylaws, 1972
32 Membership Roster, 1972
33 Constitution and Bylaws, 1974
34 Constitution and Bylaws, 1979
2 Officer and Committee Rosters, 1922-
1 1922-1939
2 1940-1949
3 1950-1959
4 1960-1969
5 1970-1979
6 1980-
2 Annual Meeting Minutes and Programs, 1922-1989
7 1922
8 1923
9 1924
10 1925
11 1926
12 1927
13 1928
14 1929
15 1930
16 1931
17 1932
18 1933
19 1934
20 1935
21 1936
22 1937
23 1938
24 1939
25 1940
26 1941
27 1942
3 Annual Meeting Programs (Cont.)
1 1945-1950
2 1951-1959
3 1900-1909
4 1970
5 1971
6 1972
7 1973
8 1974
9 1975
10 1976
11 1977
12 1978-1980
13 1989
14 ADK President’s Reports, 1950-1969 (various dates)
15 ADK Executive Secretary Report, 1946
16 ADK Executive Secretary/Director Reports, 1968-1977
3 17-18 ADK Brochures (special topics), 1975-1990
19 ADK Calendar, 1925
4 Minutes of the Board of Governors and Executive Committee
1 1922
2 1923
3 1924
4 1925
5 1926
6 1927
7 1928
8 1929
9 1930
10 1931
11 1932
12 1933
13 1934
14 1935
15 1936
16 1937
17 1938
18 1939
19 1940
20 1941
21 1942-1947
22 1948
23 1949
5 Minutes of the Board of Governors (Cont.)
1 1950
2 1951
3 1952
4 1953
5 1954
6 1955
7 1956
8 1957
9 1958
10 1959
11 1960
5 Minutes of the Board of Governors (Cont.)
12 1961
13-14 1962
15 1963
6 Minutes of the Board of Governors (Cont.)
1-2 1964
3-4 1965
5-6 1966
7-8 1967
9-10 1968
11 1969
12 1970
13 1971
14 1972
7 Minutes of the Board of Governors (Cont.)
1 1973
2 1974
3 1975
4-5 1976
6-7 1977
8 1978
9 1980
10 1981
11 1982
12 1983
13 1989
8 Minutes of the Board of Governors (Annotated), 1971-1975
9 Treasurer’s Reports (Financial Statements), 1922-1978
1 1922-1925
2 1926-1927
3 1928-1929
4 1930
5 1931-1932
6 1933-1934
9 Treasurer’s Reports (Financial Statements), 1922-1978 (Cont.)
7 1935-1936
8 1937-1939
9 1940-1944
10 1945-1946
11 1947
12 1948
13 1949
14 1950
15 1951-1952
16 1953
17 1954
18 1955
19 1956
20 1957
21 1958
22 1959
23 1960
24 1961
25 1962
26 1963
10 Treasurer’s Reports, 1922-1978 (Cont.)
1 1964
2 1965
3 1966
4 1967
5 1968
6 1969
7 1970
8 1971
9 1972
10 1973
11 1974
12 1975
13 1976
14 1977
15 1978
11 Correspondence – General, 1922-1969
1-5 1922
6-9 1923
10-12 1924
13-17 1925 (January-September)
12 Correspondence – General, 1922-1969 (Cont.)
1-2 1925 (October-December)
3-6 1926
7-10 1927
11-16 1928
17-20 1929
13 Correspondence – General, 1922-1969 (Cont.)
1-7 1930
8-12 1931
13-17 1932 (January-May)
14 Correspondence – General, 1922-1969 (Cont.)
1-7 1932 (June-December)
8-16 1933
17-18 1934 (January)
15 Correspondence – General, 1922-1969 (Cont.)
1-11 1934 (February-December)
12-15 1935 (January-March)
16 Correspondence – General, 1922-1969 (Cont.)
1-7 1935 (April-December)
8-15 1936 (January-October)
17 Correspondence – General, 1922-1969 (Cont.)
1-2 1936 (November-December)
3-12 1937
13-17 1938 (January-May)
18 Correspondence – General, 1922-1969 (Cont.)
1-6 1938 (June-December)
7-12 1939
13-17 1940
19 Correspondence – General, 1922-1929 (Cont.)
1-8 1941
9-13 1942
14-17 1943 (January-July)
20 Correspondence – General, 1922-1969 (Cont.)
1-2 1943 (August-December)
3-6 1944
7-12 1945
13-16 1946
17-18 1947 (January-June)
21 Correspondence – General, 1922-1969 (Cont.)
1-2 1947 (July-December)
3-8 1948
9-18 1949 (January-October)
22 Correspondence – General, 1922-1969 (Cont.)
1-2 1949 (November-December)
3-11 1950
12-18 1951
23 – General, 1922-1969 (Cont.)
1-6 1952
7-11 1953
12-14 1954
15-17 1955
24 – General, 1922-1969 (Cont.)
1-4 1956
5-9 1957
10-12 1958
13-15 1959
16-17 1960
18-19 1961
25 – General, 1922-1969
1-9 1962
10-14 1963 (January-April)
26 – General, 1922-1969 (Cont.)
1-8 1963 (May-December)
9-15 1964 (January-July)
27 – General, 1922-1969 (Cont.)
1-6 1964 (August-December)
7-18 1965
28 – General, 1922-1969 (Cont.)
1-9 1966
10-14 1967
15-16 1968
17 1969
29 – Executive Director, 1954-1975
Alphabetical and Name Files, 1954-1965
1-3 A
4 Allen, Herbert E. (1954-1961)
5-11 B
12-15 C
16-17 D
30 – Executive Director, 1954-1975 (Cont.)
Alphabetical and Name Files, 1954-1965
1-7 Deniston, Robert
8-9 E
10-11 F
12-14 G
15-17 H (1954-1959)
31 – Executive Director, 1954-1975 (Cont.)
Alphabetical and Name Files, 1954-1965 (Cont.)
1-4 H (1960-1965)
5 Haddad, Elsie (1960-1962)
6-7 I-J
8-9 Johnson, Theron (1964-1965)
10-12 K
13-15 L
32 – Executive Director, 1954-1975 (Cont.)
Alphabetical and Name Files, 1954-1965 (Cont.)
1-6 M
7 Marshall, George (1954-1958)
8 Mills, Borden H. (1957-1963)
9-10 N
11 Newhouse, David (1962-1965)
12-19 Newkirk, Arthur (1954-1965)
15-16 Nichols, David E. (1955-1965)
17 Nixon, Edgar F. (1960-1965)
18 O
19 P
33 – Executive Director, 1954-1975 (Cont.)
Alphabetical and Name Files, 1954-1955 (Cont.)
1-5 P
6-7 Porter, L. Morgan (1954-1965)
8-10 Q-R
11-16 S
17 Shorey, A.T. (1954-1957)
34 – Executive Director, 1954-1975 (Cont.)
Alphabetical and Name Files, 1954-1965 (Cont.)
1-3 T
4-6 Tyler, A. Ranger (1956-1961)
7-8 U-V
10-15 W
16 X-Y-Z
17-19 Young, Henry L. (1962-1965)
35 – Executive Director, 1954-1975 (Cont.)
Chronological Files , 1966-1975
1-3 1966
4-6 1967
7-9 1968
10-11 1969
12-14 1970 (January-October)
36 – Executive Director, 1954-1975 (Cont.)
Chronological Files , 1966-1975 (Cont.)
1-2 1970 (November-December)
3-13 1971
14-15 1972 (January-February)
37 – Executive Director, 1954-1975
Chronological Files , 1966-1975 (Cont.)
1-11 1972 (March-December)
12-14 1973 (January-May)
38 – Executive Director, 1954-1975 (Cont.)
1-5 1973 (June-December)
6-12 1974
13-15 1975
39 – Executive Director, 1954-1975 (Cont.)
ADK President Files, 1966-1975
1 Johnson, Theron C., 1966
2-3 Newhouse, David L., 1967-1968
4-5 Oliver, Frank J., 1968-1970
6-13 Strobel, Rudolph W., 1970-1972
40 – Executive Director, 1954-1975 (Cont.)
ADK President Files, 1966-1975 (Cont.)
1-9 Hackett, Frederick K., 1972-1974
10-12 Fish, Glen W., 1974-1975
41 – Executive Director, 1954-1975 (Cont.)
ADK Treasurer (Robert Denniston), 1966-1975 (Cont.)
1-2 1966
3-5 1967
6-7 1968
8 1970
9-11 1971
12-14 1972
42 – Executive Director, 1954-1975 (Cont.)
ADK Treasurer (Robert Denniston), 1966-1975 (Cont.)
1-3 1973
4-5 1974
6-8 1975
43 – ADK President, 1952-1974
1 Goldthwaite, George E., 1952
Newkirk, Arthur E., 1954-1956
2-5 General, 1954-1956
6 w/Executive Secretary, 1954-1956
7 w/Treasurer, 1954-1956
Tyler, A. Roger, 1956-1958
8-12 Chronological, 1956 – October 1958
Name Files, 1956-1958
13 Denniston, Robert
14 Haddad, Elsie
15 Hammond, Henry
16 Hart, M. Kimball
17 Loope, P. Fay
18 Marshall, George
19 New Kirk, Arthur
20 Porter, L. Morgan
21 Young, Henry L.
44 – ADK President, 1952-1954 (Cont.)
Young, Henry L., 1963-1964
1-2 1963
3-13 1964
45 – ADK President, 1952-1974 (Cont.)
Strobel, Rudolph W., 1970-1972
1-2 1970
3-10 1971
11-12 1972
46 – ADK President, 1952-1974 (Cont.)
Hackett, Frederick K., 1972-1974
1-2 1972
3-7 1973
8-11 1974
47 – ADK Treasurer, 1967-1972
1 1967-1968
2 1/1969-9/1970
3 10/1970-12/1970
4 3/1971-4/1971
5 5/1971-6/1971
6 7/1971-10/1971
7 11/1971-12/1971
8 1/1972-2/1972
9 3/1972-4/1972
10 5/1972-8/1972
11 9/1972-12/1972
48 Constitution and Bylaws Committee, 1925-1977
Correspondence, Memoranda, and Reports, 1925-1977
1 1925-1926
2 1930-1938
3 1945-1947
4-5 1948-1949
6 1950-1955
7 1955-1961
8 1965-1966
9 1967-1968
10 1969
11-12 1970-1971
13-14 1972
15 1973-1974
16 1975-1977
49 Constitution and Bylaws Committee, 1925-1986 (Cont.)
Correspondence, Memoranda, and Reports, 1925-1986
1-2 1978
3 1979-1981
4 1982
5 1983
6 1984
7 1985
8 1986
Membership Committee, 1922-1989
Reports, 1922-1983
9 1922-1931
10 1932-1941
11 1945-1947
12 1948-1949
13 1950-1961
14 1965-1969
15 1970
16 1971
17 1972
50 Membership Committee, 1922-1989 (Cont.)
Reports, 1922-1983 (Cont.)
1 1973
2 1974
3 1975
4 1976-1983
Correspondence, 1946-1974
5 1946-1956
6 1964-1965
7 1966-1967
8 1968
9 1969
10-11 1970
12-13 1971
14 1972 (January-June)
51 Membership Committee, 1922-1989 (Cont.)
Correspondence, (1946-1974 (Cont.)
1 1972 (July-December)
2 1973
3 1974
Roster Subcommittee, 1968-1969
4 General Correspondence
5-6 Chapter Reports
Membership Committee, 1922-1989 (Cont.)
7 Membership Statistical Analysis, 1969-1970
8 Procedures Manual Proposals, 1970
Membership Drive (Ad-hoc Committee), 1980-1981
9 Proceedings
10 Form Letters
11 Chapter Reports
12 Questionnaires
13 Winners
14 Report: Results of Membership Survey, 1988
15 Report: Survey of Public Contacts, 1988
16 Membership Promotion, 1989-1990
52 Membership Committee, 1922-1990
1-2 Statistical Analysis, 1990
3 Membership Application Forms, 1922-1950
4 Charter Membership Lists and Rosters, 1921-1922
Rosters and Special Lists, 1930-1968
5 1930-1931
6 1935-1936
7 1937
8 1938-1939
9 1942
10 1947-1948
11 1949
12 1950-1951
13 1952-1954
14 1960
15 1963-1965
16 1968
53 Nominating Committee, 1936-1982
Correspondence and Reports, 1936-1982
1 1936-1945
2 1946-1954
3 1955-1956
4 1957-1959
5 1960-1961
6 1962-1964
7 1965-1966
8-9 1967
10 1968
11 1969-1970
12 1971
13 1972
14-15 1973
16 1974
54 Nominating Committee, 1936-1982 (Cont.)
Correspondence and Reports, 1936-1982 (Cont.)
1-2 1975
3-5 1976
6 1977
7 1978-1979
8-9 1980
10-11 1982
12-13 Chairman’s Correspondence, 1975
14 Special Task Force, 1964-1965
15 Committee Manual, 1965
16 Board of Governors Selection (Ad-hoc Committee), 1968-1969
17 Nominating Procedures (Ad-hoc Committee), 1970
55 Budget Committee, 1952-1972
Correspondence, Memoranda, and Reports, 1952-1972
1 1952-1959
2 1960-1961
3 1961-1962
4 1962-1963
5 1963-1964
6 1964-1965
55 Budget Committee, 1952-1972
Correspondence, Memoranda, and Reports, 1952-1972 (Cont.)
7-8 1965-1966
9-10 1966-1967
11-12 1967-1968
13-14 1968-1969
15 1969-1970
56 Budget Committee, 1952-1972
Correspondence, Memoranda, and Reports, 1952-1972 (Cont.)
1-3 1970-1971
4-5 1971-1972
Correspondence of Jane (McActron) Davis, 1968-1969
6 Committee Operations Policies
7 Publications
8-9 Treasurer
Finance Committee, 1972-1989
10 Minutes and Reports, 1972-1989
Budget Ledgers. 1971-1976
11 1971-1972
12 1972-1973
13 1973-1974
14 1974-1975
15 1975-1976
57 Finance Committee, 1972-1989 (Cont.)
Financial Reports (Annotated), 1971-1976
1 1971
2 1972
3 1973
4 1974
5 1975
6 1976
Treasurer’s Reports and Notes, 1971-1974
7 1971-1972
8 1973-1974
Budget and Financial Audit, 1975-1976
9 Administrative (Office)
57 Finance Committee, 1972-1989 (Cont.)
Budget and Financial Audit, 1975-1976 (Cont.)
10 Adirondac Magazine
11 Campers and Hikers Building
12 Committees
13 Foundation (ADKF)
14 Income (dues and sales)
15 Long Range Plans
16 Summary
58 Finance Committee, 1972-1989 (Cont.)
Memoranda and Reports, 1979-1989
1-1 1979
2-5 1980
6 1981
7-8 1982
9-10 1983
11 1984
12 1985
13 1986
14 1987
59 Finance Committee, 1972-1989 (Cont.)
Memoranda and Reports, 1979-1989 (Cont.)
1-2 1987 (Cont.)
3-7 1988
8-9 1989
Publications Department Financial Analysis, 1989
10 Administration and Production
11-12 Budget and Inventory
13 Finances
60 Special (Ad-hoc) Committees – Administration and Finance
1 Archives, 1951-1975
2 Audit, 1952-1958
3 Awards, 1968-1969
4 Bookkeeping, 1952-1953
5 Dues Exemption, 1974
6-7 Education Fund, 1970-1971
8-9 Executive Secretary Position Analysis, 1973
10-11 Executive Director, Search Committee, 1982
12 Finance, 1957-1958
Finance, 1968-1969
13 Accounting Procedures
14-16 Insurance
17 Investments
18 Property Depreciation
19 Salaries
20 Tax Exemption
61 Special Committees (Cont.)
1 Fiscal Management and Accounting, 1976
Fundraising, 1982-1988
2-3 1982
4-5 1983
6-7 1984
8-10 1985
11 1986
12 1987
13-14 1988
15 Future of ADK Headquarters, 1983
62 Special Committees – Administration and Finance (Cont.)
1 Insurance, 1974
2 Internal Communications, 1981
3-6 Long Range Planning, 1970-1972
7-10 Management Study Task Force, 1978-1979
Long Range Planning, 1979-1981
11-12 Proceedings, 1979-1981
13 Notes and Charts, 1980-1981
14 Management Report, 1979
15 Work Plan, 1980
16 Work Goals, 1981
Five Year Plans
17 1988-1992
18 1989-1993
19 1990-1994
63 Special Committees – Administration and Finance (Cont.)
1 Mailing List, 1973-1974
2 Memorial (William Heward), 1949-1951
Memorials, 1967-1978
3 Reports, 1967-1972
4 Club Policy, 1967
Correspondence
5 1966
6-7 1967
8 1968-1969
9 1970-1971
10 1972-1978
11 Office, 1955-1956
12 Office Expenses, 1973-1974
13 Office Procedures, 1978
14 Personnel, 1974-1977
16 Tax Exemption, 1974
64 Administrative Office Files, etc. 1949-1990
1 Addressograph-Multigraph Co., 1957-1970
2 Bank Accounts, 1977
3 Book and Ephemera Donations, 1975-1982
4 Business and Corporate Memberships, 1989
5 Calendar, 1975-1980
6 Dues Increase Proposals, 1974-1978
7 Dun & Bradstreet Listing, 1977
8 Executive Committee Memoranda, 1971-1975
9 Executive Director Performance Plan, 1983
Headquarters
10-11 Glens Falls Property Evaluation, 1973-1974
12 Glens Falls Property Lease Termination, 1989
13 Lake George Relocation, 1989-1990
14 Insurance Policies, 1950-1953
15 Mail Inventories, 1972-1980
16 Mailing Permits, 1949-1959
17 Meeting Procedures, 1965
18-19 Policy and Procedures Manual, c. 1980
20 Press Coverage, 1982-1983
21 Scholarship Proposal, 1949
22 Mountain-ear (Newsletter), 1971-1974
65 Adirondack Mountain Club Foundation, 1972-1986
1 History
2 Brochures
3 Pre-organization Proposals, 1968-1972
4 Organization Meeting Proceedings, 1972
5 Constitution and Bylaws, 1972
6 Certificate of Incorportion, 1972
7 Certificate of Dissolution, 1980
Minutes, 1972-1979
8 1972
9 1973
10 1974
11 1975
12 1976
13 1977-1979
14-15 Reports to the ADK Board of Governors, 1972-1979
16 Roster of ADKF Officers, 1972-1980
17 Dissolution Proceedings, 1979-1980
66 Adirondack Mountain Club Foundation, 1972-1980 (Cont.)
General Correspondence, 1972-1980
1-2 1972
3 1973
4-5 1974
6-8 1975
9 1976
10 1977
11-12 1978
13 1979
14 1980
67 Adirondack Mountain Club Foundation, 1972-1980 (Cont.)
President’s Correspondence, 1975-1980
1 1975
2 1976
3 1977
4-5 1978
6-7 1979
8 1980
67 Adirondack Mountain Club Foundation, 1972-1980 (Cont.)
Fundraising Committee, 1972-1975
9-10 Correspondence, 1972-1975
11 Fund Drive Plan, 1972
12 Volunteers, 1973
13 Grant Evaluation Committee, 1972-1978
Grant Projects, 1972-1978
14 ADK Headquarters, 1975
15 Campers and Hikers Building, 1972-1973
16 Canoe Routes, 1972-1973
17 Nature Conservancy, 1973
18-19 Ridge Runner Program, 1972-1973
18 Search and Rescue, 1974-1975
19 Ton-Du-Lay Legal Defense Fund, 1974-1975
68 Adirondack Mountain Club Foundation, 1972-1980 (Cont.)
1-3 Financial Statements, 1972-1979
4 Chapter Contribution Records, 1972-1975
5 Individual Contribution Records, 1972-1975
6 Estate Bequests, 1972
7-9 Invoices (Bills and Receipts), 1972-1979
10 Charitable Contribution Solicitation Report, 1978
11-13 Income Tax Exemption Returns, 1972-1979
69 Adirondack Loj, 1958-1988
1 History
2-5 Brochures
6 Operations Committee Charter, 1969; revised 1980
Operations Committee Minutes; 1958-1988
7 1958-1961
8 1962-1963
9 1964-1965
10 1966-1967
11 1968-1969
12 1970
13 1971
14-15 1972
16 1973
17 1974
70 Adirondack Loj, 1958-1988 (Cont.)
Operations Committee Minutes, 1958-1988 (Cont.)
1 1975
2 1976
3 1977
4 1978-1979
5-7 1980
8-10 1981
11 1982
12-13 1983
14 1984
71 Adirondack Loj, 1958-1988
Operations Committee Minutes, 1958-1988
1 1985
2 1986
3 1987
4 1988
Correspondence, 1958-1975
5-6 1958
7 1960-1961
8-9 1962
10-12 1963
13-14 1964
15 1965
72 Adirondack Loj, 1958-1988 (Cont.)
Correspondence, 1958-1975
1 1966
2 1967
3 1968
4 1969
5-6 1970
7-12 1971
13-14 1972 (January-March)
73 Adirondack Loj, 1958-1988 (Cont.)
Correspondence, 1958-1975
1-3 1972 (April-December)
4 1973
5 1974
6-7 1975
73 Adirondack Loj, 1958-1988 (Cont.)
Correspondence – Name Files, 1970-1980
8 Brusgal, Rex, 1980
9 Davis, Richard, 1977-1978
10-11 Endicott, William, 1971-1978
12 Erenstone, Richard, 1978-1979
13 Fowler, Paul, 1980
14-15 Gamble, Henry, 1971-1976
16 Newkirk, Arthur, 1977
17 Obrist, Alfred, 1974-1979
18 Stacy, John, 1978-1979
74 Adirondack Loj, 1958-1988 (Cont.)
1-2 Special Fund Committee (Ad-hoc), 1958-1962
Capitol Improvement Fund Committee, 1962-1967
3-6 1962
7 1963
8-9 1964
10-11 1965
12 1966
13 1967
14 Capitol Improvement Fund Tax Exemption, 1959-1964
15 Mortgage Amortilization, 1968
75 Adirondack Loj, 1958-1988 (Cont.)
Budget and Finance, 1969-1982
1 1969-1970
2 1970-1971
3 1971-1972
4 1972-1973
5 1974-1975
1975-1980
6 Annual and Monthly Reports
7 Cost Center Accounts
8 Memoranda and Notes
9 1981-1982
Use Book (Manual), 1965-1970
10 Preliminary edition, 1965
11 Final edition, 1966
12 Revised Information, 1973-1975
Loj Planning Committee, 1964-1970
13 1964
14-15 1969-1970
Long Range Plans
16 1969
17 1974
76 Adirondack Loj, 1958-1988 (Cont.)
1 Climbers Lodge Proposal, 1965
Campers and Hikers Building Committee, (Ad hoc), 1973-1974
2-6 Correspondence, Memoranda, etc., 1973-1974
7 Bid Proposal, 1973
8 Campers and Hikers Building Fund Drive, 1976-1977
9 Chapter Gifts, 1980-1981
10 Cash Register Purchase, 1970
11 Gravel Pit, 1973
12 Parking Lot, 1972-1973
13 Project Picnic Tables, 1966
14 Property Insurance, 1966-1967
15 Staff (Employment), 1980-1982
16 Topographical Survey, 1968-1969
17 Water Supply Study, 1981
18 Nature Trail Guides and other brochures
19 Photographs: Snowman, 1975
77 Adirondack Loj, 1958-1988 (Cont.)
1 Lease Agreement with Lake Placid Club, 1946
2 Purchase Agreement with Lake Placid Club, 1958
3 Land Survey Map, 1963
4 Building Contract and Specifications, 1962
5 Architects Sketch of Building
6 Blueprint of Annex and other alternations, (certified), 1962
7 Blueprints (drafts), 1962
8 Preliminary sketches of Annex designs, ca. 1962
9 Original Floor Plans, ca. 1928
10 Revised Floor Plans showing minor structural alternations
11 Revised Floor Plans showing proposed kitchen Annex
12 Revised Floor Plans w/kitchen Annex (Annotated)
13 Alternative Bid Proposals, ca. 1962
14 Campground Latrine Contract and Specifications, 1962
15 Campers and Hikers Building Contract and
Specifications, 1973
78 John Brooks Lodge, 1923-1988
1 History
2-3 Brochures, 1929-1976
4 Cadastral Maps, 1923-1924
Landtitles, 1923-1929
5 Quit-Claim Deeds: J.J. Rogers to ADK, 1923
6 Deed: Melvin Hathaway Jr. ADK, 1924
7 Deed: Nettie Whitney and others to ADK, 1927
8 Deed: Homer Brown and others to ADK, 1929
9 Building Committee Proceedings; 1924-1925
10 Mortgage Fund Reports and Subscription Lists, 1925-1930
House Committee Reports, 1925-1954
11 1925-1929
12 1930-1944
13 1945-1954
Operations Committee, 1955-1988
14-15 1955
16-17 1956
18-19 1957
20 1958
79 John Brooks Lodge, 1923-1988 (Cont.)
Operations Committee, 1955-1988 (Cont.)
1 1962-1965
2 1966
3 1967
4 1968
5 1969
6 1970
7 1971
8 1972
9 1973-1974
10 1975
11 1976
12 1977
13 1978
14 1979
15-16 1980
80 John Brooks Lodge, 1923-1988 (Cont.)
Operations Committee, 1955-1988 (Cont.)
1-2 1981
3-4 1982
5-7 1983
8-9 1984
10 1985
11 1986
12 1987
13-14 1988
81 John Brooks Lodge, 1923-1988 (Cont.)
1 Committee Charters, 1969-1980
2 Financial Audit, 1936
3-4 Budget and Financial Reports, 1969-1980
5 Access Road Proposals, 1933-1946
6 Camp Grace Blueprints and notes, 1956-1958
Crew Quarters Building,
7 APA Permit Application, 1976
8 APA Hearing Proceedings, 1976
9 Occupancy Data, 1979-1981
10 Form Letters, etc., 1925-1930
Scenic Easement Committee, 1974-1976
11 Correspondence and Memoranda
12 Contract Proposals
Future of the Lodges Committee (Ad-hoc), 1979-1980
13-16 Proceedings, 1979-1980
17-18 Draft and Final Reports, 1980
82 Environmental Assessment Task Force, 1988-1989
1-3 General Proceedings, 1988-1989
4-6 JBL Camp Peggy O’Brien Study and Report, 1989
7-10 Loj-Heart Lake Trail Cabin Study and Report, 1989
11 ADK Education Center Proposal, 1988
83 Conservation Committee, 1922-1988
1 History
Reports (Annual and Periodic), 1922-1983
2 1922-1934
3 1935-1939
4 1945-1949
5 1950-1951
83 Conservation Committee, 1922-1988 (Cont.)
Reports (Annual and Periodic), 1922-1983 (Cont.)
6 1952-1954
7 1955-1959
8 1960-1961
9 1962-1963
10 1964-1965
11 1968-1970
12 1972-1973
13 1974-1975
14 1976-1977
15 1981-1983
84 Conservation Committee, 1922-1988 (Cont.)
ADK Policy: Correspondence, Reports, Resolutions
1 1922-1928
2 1935-1936
3 1944-1945
4 1962
General Correspondence, 1951-1952; 1969-1970
5 1951
6 1952
7 1953
8 1969-1970
Frederick Hackett Correspondence, 1972-1975
9-12 1972
13-15 1973
16 1974-1975
85 Conservation Committee, 1922-1988 (Cont.)
1 Mountain Slope Protection Motion, 1922
2 Recreation Amendment, 1932
3 Wildlife Sanctuary Proposal, 1935
4 Forest Fire Truck Road, 1935
5 Civilian Conservation Corps. 1935
6 New York State Constitutional Convention, 1938
7 Conservation Committee Legislation Bulletins, 1939
8 Whiteface Mountain Amendment, 1941
Adirondack Wilderness Committee, 1944
9 Correspondence
10 Lumbering in the Forest Preserve
11 Mead Highway Proposal
12 Recreation in the Forest Preserve
Conservation Forum, 1945
13 Reports and Resolutions
14 Correspondence, January-June 1945
15 Correspondence, September-October 1945
16 Camping in New York State Parks Report, 1945
17 Adirondack Moose River Committee, 1945-1946
86 Conservation Committee, 1922-1988 (Cont.)
1 Panther Dam and Reservoir, 1945-1955
2 Recreation Amendments, 1946-1949
3 River Regulation Legislation, 1949-1952
4 Submerged Land Legislation, 1949-1950
5 Amendment 9 Campaign, 1953
6 Forest Fire Protection Legislation, 1951
Forestry and Lumbering Legislation, 1949-1958
7 1949-1952
8 1953-1954
9 1957-1958
10 Land Acquisition (Ad-hoc Committee), 1955-1958
11 Lake George Water Level Legislation, 1957-1959
Adirondack Northway Route Controversy, 1957-1958
12-14 Correspondence, 1957-1958
15 Champlain Route Proposal
16 D.P.W. Interstate Route Study, FAI 502
17 Newsclippings and articles, 1958
87 Conservation Committee, 1922-1988 (Cont.)
1-2 Pomeroy Wilderness Protection Bill, 1961
3 Airetta Highway Amendment, 1961
4 N.Y. Conservation Dept. Forest Preserve Policy, 1965
5 New York State Constitutional Convention, 1967
6 Adirondack National Park Proposal, 1967
7 Gooley Dam Proposal, 1968-1969
8-9 Snowmobile Use Regulations, 1969-1970
10-11 Conservation Bill of Rights, 1969-1970
12-13 Future of the Adirondacks Study Commission, 1969-1970
14-15 Adirondack Park Private Land Use and Development Plan, 1972-1973
16 Helms v. Diamond (Lake Closing Case), 1974
17 Adirondack Litigation Coalition, 1975
88 Conservation Committee (Cont.)
1 Report: Environmental Considerations for Development, 1975
2 State Land Master Plan Revision Proposals, 1976-1978
3 Adirondack Park Local Review Board, 1977
4 APA Policy Review, 1985-1988
5 Tug Hill Commission Report on Acid Rain, 1982
Wilderness Committee, 1973-1979
6-7 Correspondence and Reports, 1973-1979
8 Wilderness Area Management Plan, 1975
9 Wildlife Management Survey, 1979
10-11 Wild and Scenic Rivers Rules and Regulations, 1975-1976
12 Wild and Scenic Rivers Resource Evaluation Data, 1975
13 Wild and Scenic Rivers Nationwide Inventory, 1981
14 Winter Olympic Liaison Committee (Ad-hoc), 1975-1976
Relationship with other Conservation Organizations (Ad-hoc), 1976-1978
15-16 Minutes and Reports, 1977-1978
17-19 Adirondack Council Correspondence, 1975-1976
89 Relationship with other Conservation Organizations (Cont.)
1-2 Adirondack Council Minutes, 1975-1976
3 Adirondack Forty-Sixers
4-5 Appalachian Mountain Club
6 Environmental Planning Lobby
7 Lake George Association
8 Miscellaneous
APA Goals Program, 1982-1983
9-13 Steering Committee Proceedings, 1982-1983
14 Socio-Economic Conditions Report, 1983
15 Work Plan
90 APA Goals Program, 1982-1983 (Cont.)
1 Communications Proposal
2 Press Releases
3 WCPE-TV Documentary
4 Form Letters
5 Workshop Moderators’ Packet
Community Workshop Packets
6 Blue Mountain Lake
7 Cranberry Lake/Star Lake
8 Duane/Dannemora
9 Elizabethtown/Ausable Falls
Community Workshop Packets (Cont.)
10 Keeseville/Westport
11 Lake George/Warrensburg
12 North Creek/Schroon Lake
13 Old Forge/Racquette Lake
14 Piseco Lake/Northville
15 Port Henry/Ticonderoga
16 Tri-Lakes
17 Miscellaneous
91 Trails Committee, 1923-1989
1 History
Reports, 1923-1989
2 1923-1939
3 1940-1949
4 1950-1959
5 1960-1969
6 1970-1979
7 1980-1989
8 Correspondence – Trail Maintenance, 1946-1953
9 Correspondence – Trail Markers, 1946-1953
Correspondence – General, 1954-1988
10 1954-1956
11 1969
12 1970
13-14 1971
15 1972
16 1973
17-18 1974
92 Trails Committee, 1922-1988
Correspondence, 1954-1988 (Cont.)
1-3 1975
4-5 1976
6-8 1977
9-10 1978
11-12 1979
13-15 1980
93 Trails Committee, 1922-1988 (Cont.)
Correspondence, 1954-1988 (Cont.)
1-2 1981
3-4 1982
5-8 1983
9-11 1984
12-13 1985
94 Trails Committee, 1922-1988 (Cont.)
Correspondence, 1954-1988 (Cont.)
1-2 1985
3 1986
4-6 1987
7-9 1988
10 Trail Construction Manual, 1923
11 Trail Maintenance Liability Report, 1947
12 Notes on Trail Conditions, 1946-1952
13 Notes on Trail Markers, 1946-1952
14 Committee Policies and Procedures, 1948-1949
95 Trails Committee, 1922-1988
1-2 Trail Maintenance Contract, 1979-1980
3-5 Trail Maintenance Manual, 1980
6-9 Trail Booster Program, 1978-1979
10 Trail Maintenance Volunteer, 1980
Trail Crews Program, 1984-1989
12-13 1984
14-15 1985
16-17 1986
18 1987-1989
96 Trails Committee, 1922-1988 (Cont.)
1 Open Camp (Lean-to) Building Manuals, 1922 and 1925
2 Northville-Lake Placid Trail Guide, 1924
New York State Trails Conference, 1935
3 Correspondence
4 Proceedings
5 Report on Ski Trails
6-7 Clean Trailsides (Ad-hoc Committee), 1966-1970
8 Chain Saw Debate, 1977
9 ADK-AMC-GMC Summitt Conferences, 1978-1982
10-11 Appalachian Trail Conference, 1975
12 Finger Lakes Trail Conference, 1982
13 Green Mountain Club, 1977
14 New York-New Jersey Trail Conference, 1977
15 New York State Trail Council, 1982
16 North Country Trail Report (draft), 1982
17-18 Potomac Appalachian Trail Club, 1975
19-20 New York State Conservation Dept. Recreation Circulars, c. 1920’s
97 Outings Committee, 1926-1989
Reports, 1926-1989
1 1926-1949
2 1950-1971
3 1972-1977
4 1982-1989
Correspondence, 1952-1972
5 1952-1956
6 1963-1966
7 1967-1969
8 1970-1971
9 1972
Flyers, 1938-1977
10 1938-1955
11 1956-1959
12 1960-1964
13 1965-1969
14 1970-1972
15 1973-1977
16-17 Outings Policy Committee, 1976-1977
98 Outdoor Activities Committee, 1934-1982
Reports, 1934-1978
1 1934-1937
2 1938-1943
3 1948-1955
4 1956-1960
5 1961-1967
6 1968-1978
General Correspondence, 1954-1982
7 1954-1959
8 1960-1966
General Correspondence, 1954-1982
9 1969-1970
10 1971-1973
11 1974-1976
12 1977-1978
13 1979-1980
14 1981-1982
15-16 Correspondence: ADK President, 1970-1972
17-18 Correspondence: Committee Chairman, 1975-1978
99 Outdoor Activities Committee, 1934-1982 (Cont.)
New York State Conference on Skiing, 1936-1939
1 1936-1937
2 1938
3 1939
4 Ski Trail Guides and Brochures, 1936-1943
5 Winter Mountaineering Guide, 1950
6 Winter Mountaineering Manual, 1957
Winter Mountaineering (VEE-Badge) Awards, 1948-1950
7 Brochures, 1948-1952
8-10 Correspondence, 1948-1950
11 Guidelines and Procedures, 1949-1950
12 Evaluation Forms, 1949-1950
13 Winter Mountaineering Conference, 1950
Cornell Outing Club Photo-Reports, 1949-1950
14-15 Mount Dix Expedition, 1949
16-17 Mount Redfield Expedition, 1949
18-19 Great Range and other Peaks, 1950
20 Algonquin and Iroquois Ascent, 1950
21 Letter and Photographs of Evelyn Comstock, 1952
22 Winter Mountaineering Awards, 1969-1975
23 Winter Mountaineering Manual, Revision, 1963-1970
24 Ski-Touring Guide, 1967-1969
25 Ski-Touring Film Production, 1972-1977
26 Report of the Joint N.Y. Legislative Committee on Winter Tourism, 1957
100 Rock Climbing School, 1965-1985
1 1965-1970
2 1977-1983
3 1985
Ridge Runner Program, 1973-1979
4 Articles, 1974-1975
Correspondence, Memoranda, Reports, etc., 1973-1979
5-6 1973-1974
7-8 1975
9 1976
10-11 1977
12 1978-1979
13 ADKF Grant Funding, 1974
14-15 Diary of Jae Lyn Burke, 1977
101 Winter Mountaineering School, 1961-1990
1 History and Brochures
Correspondence, Memoranda, Reports, etc., 1961-1990
2-3 1961-1962
4 1962-1963
5 1964-1965
6 1966-1967
7 1968-1969
8 1969-1971
9 1971-1972
10 1972-1973
11-12 1973-1974
13-14 1974-1975
15 1975-1976
16-17 1976-1977
18 1977-1978
102 Winter Mountaineering School, 1961-1990 (Cont.)
Correspondence, Memoranda, Reports, etc., 1961-1990
1 1978-1979
2 1980-1981
3 1981-1982
4-5 1982-1983
6-7 1983-1984
8 1984-1985
9 1986-1990
10-12 Weekend School Applications, 1983-1985
13 Resource Packet, ca. 1983
103 Special Committees and Programs – Recreation
1 Mount Marcy Climbing Expedition, 1937
2 College Week, 1935
3 Ad-hoc Activities Guidelines Committee, 1979
4-5 Bicycle Committee, 1977-1978
6-7 High Peaks Advisory Committee, 1975-1977
8-9 Hikers Fees Committee, 1976
10 Miscellaneous
Search and Rescue Committee, 1971-1977
11 1971-1972
12-14 1973
15-16 1974
17 1973-1977
104 Publications Committee, 1922-1989
1 History of ADK Publications
Reports, 1922-1976
2 1922-1945
3 1946-1957
4 1960-1976
Correspondence: General, 1948-1972
5 1948-1951
6 1954-1956
7 1967-1969
8 1970
9-10 1971
11 1972
Correspondence: Subject Files, 1967-1970
12 Author Royalties, 1967-1970
13 Accounting, 1970
14 Fundraising, 1970
15 Letters and notes of Russell M.L. Carson, 1928
16 Copyright Applications, 1934-1957
17 Inventories, 1967-1972
18 Order Forms, 1927-1972
105 Publications Committee, 1922-1989 (Cont.)
1 Reorganization, 1977-1979
Correspondence, Memoranda, Reports, etc., 1977-1989
2 1977-1978
3-4 1979
5-6 1980
7 1981
8 1982
9-10 1983
11-14 1984
106 Publications Committee, 1922-1989 (Cont.)
Correspondence, Memoranda, Reports, etc., 1977-1989
1-2 1984
3-4 1985
5-6 1986
7 1987
8-10 1988
11-12 1989
107 Map and Guidebook Committee, 1922-1976
Reports, 1922-1976
1 1922-1933
2 1934-1948
3 1949-1959
4 1960-1978
Correspondence, 1954-1976
5 1954-1956
6 1964-1970
7-8 1971
9 1972
10 1975-1976
Trail Guide Material, 1931-1934
11 Outline, 1930-1934
12-13 Trail Data, 1931
14-15 Trail Route Descriptions, 1933
16 Publicity Flyers, etc., 1934
17 Correspondence: Orra Phelps and A.T. Shorey, 1936
18 Trails of the Schroon Lake Region (Shorey), 1935
19 Trails of the Piseco Lake Region (Shorey), 1935
20 Trail Maps, 1934-1940
21 Reviews of Revised Trail Book, 1957
108 Map Marking Service, 1968-1972
Correspondence: 1968-1972
1 1968-1969
2 1970
3-4 1971
5 1972
Bibliography Committee, 1948-1973
Reports, 1948-1973
6 1948-1954
7 1955-1959
8 1960-1973
Correspondence, 1955-1973
9 1955
10 1956
11 1957
12 1958-1959
13 1967-1969
14 1970
15 1971-1973
16 Adirondack Bibliography Supplements, 1960 and 1962
17 Miscellaneous
109 Adirondac Magazine Committee, 1954-1989
Correspondence, 1956-1989
1 1956-1958
2 1959-1960
3 1963-1966
4 1967-1968
5 1969
6 1970
7-8 1971
9-11 1972
12 1973
13 1974
14 1975
15 1976
16 1977
17 1978
110 Adirondac Magazine Committee, 1954-1989 (Cont.)
Correspondence, 1956-1989
1-2 1979
3-4 1980
5-7 1981
8-10 1982
11-14 1983
111 Adirondac Magazine Committee, 1954-1989 (Cont.)
Correspondence, 1956-1989
1-3 1984
4-6 1985
7-8 1986
9 1987
10-11 1988
12-14 1989
112 Adirondac Magazine Committee, 1954-1989 (Cont.)
Correspondence-Subject Files, 1954-1983
1 Advertising, 1973-1980
2-3 Book Reviews, 1976-1982
4 Editing, 1984-1985
5-6 Editorial Policy Board, 1971-1983
7 Postage and Handling, 1957-1976
8 Recycled Paper, 1980
9 Subscriptions – Complimentary, 1955-1963
10 Subscriptions – Renewals, 1954-1972
11-15 Ad-hoc Committee Files, 1984
113 Public Information – Education Committee, 1923-1980
Reports, 1923-1980
1 1923-1940
2 1940-1959
3 1965-1975
4 1976-1980
Correspondence, 1954-1980
5 1954-1956
6 1964-1987
7 1968-1970
8-9 1971
10-11 1972
12-14 1973
15-17 1974
114 Public Information-Education Committee, 1923-1980
Correspondence, 1954-1980 (Cont.)
1-3 1975
4-7 1976
8-10 1977
11 1978
12-13 Budget and Finance, 1973-1979
14 Chapter Manuals, 1973
15 Chapter Public Information, 1973-1974
16 Visual Education (Ad-hoc Committee), 1954-1965
115 Public Information-Education Committee, 1923-1980
Camp Outreach Program, 1976-1977
1 Minutes, 1976-1977
2 General Correspondence, 1976-1977
3 Camp Director Correspondence, 1977
4-5 Questionnaires, 1977
6 Resource Packet, 1977
7 Workshop, 1977
8 Economic Conference, 1976
9-11 Environmental Workshops, 1978-1979
12 Audio Visual Programs, 1975-1978
13 Broadcast Media Communications, 1975-1977
14-15 Directory Listings, etc., 1971-1977
116 Public Information-Education Committee, 1923-1980 (Cont.)
1-2 Published Manuscripts, 1976-1978
3 Unpublished Manuscripts, 1977-1978
Brochure Writing and Editing Files, 1975-1978
4 Backpacking
5 Bears
6 Beginning Hiker
7 Hypothermia
8 Winter Mountaineering
9 Brochure Illustrations, 1976-1978
Education Committee, 1980-1989
10 Charter, 1980-1984
11 Director’s Reports, 1981-1982
Proceedings, 1980-1987
12 1980-1981
13 1982-1983
14 1984
15 1985
16 1986-1987
117 Education Committee, 1980-1987
Correspondence, Memoranda, etc., 1980-1988
1 1980
2-3 1981
4 1982
5-6 1983
7-8 1984
9-10 1985
11-12 1986
118 Education Committee, 1980-1988
Correspondence, Memoranda, etc., 1980-1988 (Cont.)
1-2 1987
3 1988
4 Visual Projection (Slide) Programs, 1982-1984
5-7 Workshops, 1981-1984
8-11 ADK-DEC Education Program, 1981-1982
12 Wilderness Recreation Conference, 1983
13 Conservation Summit, 1984
14 Project Learning Tree, 1986-1987
119 Press Releases, 1955-1982
1 1955-1959
2 1964-1966
3 1967-1972
4 1973-1974
5 1975-1978
6 1979-1982
120 Natural History Committee, 1964-1988
1 Reports to the Board of Governors, 1967-1988
Correspondence, 1964-1988
2 1964-1966
3 1967
4 1968-1970
5 1970-1971
6 1972-1973
7 1974
8 1975
9 1976-1977
10 1978
11 1979
12 1980
13-14 1981
121 Natural History Committee, 1964-1988 (Cont.)
Correspondence, 1964-1988 (Cont.)
1 1982
2 1983
3 1984
4 1985-1986
5 1987
6 1988
7 Adirondack Geology for Hikers (Wyckoff), 1967
ADK Fiftieth Anniversary Committee, 1971-1973
8 Reports to the Board of Governors, 1971-1973
Correspondence, 1971-1973
9-10 General, 1971-1973
11 Writers, 1972
12 Randall Brune, 1972
13 Clinton Miller, 1972
14 Arthur Newkirk, 1972
15 Rudolph Strobel, 1972
16 Historical Notes and Chronological Outline, 1972
17 Drafts of Articles, 1972
122 ADK Fiftieth Anniversary Committee, 1971-1973 (Cont.)
1 Committee History Articles, 1972
2-4 Chapter Surveys, 1971-1972
Forest Preserve Centennial Committee, 1984-1985
5 Special Reports and Press Releases, 1983-1984
6 Programs, 1985
7-9 Photograph Exhibit and Contest, 1985
10 Visual Projection (Slide) Show, 1985
11 WCPE Television Documentary, 1985
Miscellaneous Topical Files
12 Adirondack Council, 1988
13 Adirondack Mountain Training Project, 1980
14 Anti-Litter Campaign, 1987
15 Camp Sanitation, 1979-1982
16 Chiltern Society, 1969-1970
17 Earth Day, 1980
18 Indian Affairs, 1974-1975
19 Litter Cleanup Program, 1956, 1970-1976
20 Mountain Libraries Report, 1973
21 Mountain Medicine Symposium, 1976
22 Music and Poetry, 1956
23 Raquette Lake House, History
24 Remsen & Lake Placid R.R., Report, 1975
25 Tahawus Sport Show Exhibit, 1949
26 Treasure Tours International, 1971
123 Chapter Reports, Newsletters, etc., 1922-1989
1-4 Adirondack Loj, 1932-1983
5-9 Albany, 1925-1959; 1970-1989
10-15 Algonquin, 1950-1980
16 Ausable Valley, 1948-1952
17 Black River, 1980-1984
124 Chapter Reports, Newsletters, etc., 1922-1989 (Cont.)
1 Bouquet River Lodge, 1949-1953
2 Cold River, 1970-1980
3-4 Finger Lakes, 1973-1980
Genesee Valley, 1968-1980
5-6 Reports, 1966-1984
The Geneseean
7 1964
8 1970
9 1971
10 1972
11 1973-1974
12 1975
The Geneseean (Cont.)
13 1976
14 1977
15 1978
16 1979
17 1980
125 Chapter Reports, Newsletters, etc., 1972-1989 (Cont.)
1-2 Glens Falls, 1929-1936
3-4 Hurricane Mountain, 1947-1983
5 Iroquois, 1972-1983
6 Johns Brook Lodge, 1935-1941
7-8 Keene Valley, 1942-1980
9-10 Knickerbocker, 1973-1983
11 Lake Placid, 1969-1975
12 Laurentein, 1977-1978
Long Island, 1966-1980
13-15 Reports, 1966-1980
Long Island Mountaineer
16 1970-1972
17 1973-1976
18 1977-1978
19 1979-1980
126 Chapter Reports, Newsletters, etc., 1972-1989 (Cont.)
1-3 Mid-Hudson, 1947-1976
4 Mohican, 1984-1988
5 Montreal (Proposed) 1973-1976; 1985-1980
New York, 1972-1980
6 History, 1972
7-8 Correspondence and Reports, 1926-1934
9 Reports, 1935-1952
10-12 Reports, 1967-1980
13 Handbooks, 1964 and 1974
14 Membership Rosters, 1935-1942
15 Membership Rosters, 1966, 1969, and 1971
127 Chapter Reports, Newsletters, etc., 1972-1989 (Cont.)
New York Chapter, 1922-1980 (Cont.)
Trail Marker
1 Vol. 33, 1956
2 Vols. 34-41, 1957-1964 (scattered issues)
3 Vol. 46, 1969
4 Vol. 47, 1970
5 Vol. 48, 1971
6 Vol. 50, 1973
7 Vol. 51, 1974
8 Vol. 52, 1975
9-10 Vol. 53, 1976
11-12 Vol. 54, 1977
13 Vol. 55, 1978
14 Vol. 56, 1979
15 Vol. 57, 1980
128 Chapter Reports, Newsletters, etc., 1922-1989 (Cont.)
Niagara Frontier, 1971-1987
1 Organizational, 1971-1972
2-4 Handbook and Membership Rosters, 1973-1988
Niagara Newsletter, 1973-1978
5-6 1973
7 1975
8-9 1976
10 1977
11 1978
Niagara ADK Newsletter, 1979-1982
12-13 Vol. 1, 1979
14-15 Vol. 2, 1980
16-17 Vol. 3, 1981
18-19 Vol. 4, 1982
129 Chapter Reports, Newsletters, etc., 1922-1989 (Cont.)
1-2 North Jersey, 1970-1980
3 North Woods, 1975
4 Oneida, 1975-1978
Onondaga, 1951-1980
5 History and Organization, 1951-1976
6 Membership Roster, 1973
7 Annual Meeting Programs, 1976
8-12 Newsletters, 1973-1979
13 Outing Schedules, 1973-1980
14 Oswego, 1949
15 Penns Woods, 1982
16-17 Rampo, 1971-1980
18 Rochester, 1926-1928
19 Saint Lawrence Valley, 1972
130 Chapter Reports, Newsletters, etc., 1922-1989 (Cont.)
Schenectady, 1958-1980
1-2 Reports, 1958-1988
3-8 The Lookout, 1972-1980
9-11 Seneca, 1972-1983
12 Shatagee Woods, 1972-1979
Susquehanna, 1980-1986
13 Reports, etc., 1980-1986
14-15 Footloose, 1977-1980
ADK Chapter Annual Reports
17 1971
18 1972
19 1974
20 1975
21 1976
131 High Spots, Volumes I-XIV, 1922-1937
1 Volume I, 1922-1923
2 Volumes II and III, 1923-1925
3 Volumes IV-VI, 1926-1929
4 Volumes VII-VIII, 1930-1931
5 Volumes IX, 1932
6 Volume X, 1933
7 Volume XI, 1934
8 Volume XII, 1935
9 Volume XIII, 1936
10 Volume XIV, 1937
High Spots Yearbooks
11 1942
ADK Bulletin, Volumes I-VIII, 1936-1944
12 Volume I, 1936-1937
13 Volume II, 1938
14 Volume III, 1939
15 Volume IV, 1940
16 Volume V, 1941
17 Volume VI, 1942
18 Volume VII, 1943
19 Volume VIII, 1944
132 Adirondac
1 Volume 9, 1945
2 Volume 10, 1946
3 Volume 11, 1947
4 Volume 12, 1948
5 Volume 13, 1949
6 Volume 14, 1950
7 Volume 15, 1951
8 Volume 16, 1952
9 Volume 17, 1953
10 Volume 18, 1954
11 Volume 19, 1955
12 Volume 20, 1956
13 Volume 21, 1957
14 Volume 22, 1958
15 Volume 23, 1959
16 Volume 24, 1960
17 Volume 25, 1961
133 Adirondac
1 Volume 26, 1962
2 Volume 27, 1963
3 Volume 28, 1964
4 Volume 29, 1965
5 Volume 30, 1966
6 Volume 31, 1967
7 Volume 32, 1968
8 Volume 33, 1969
9 Volume 34, 1970
10 Volume 35, 1971
11 Volume 36, 1972
12 Volume 37, 1973
13 Volume 38, 1974
14 Volume 39, 1975
15 Volume 40, 1976
16 Volume 41, 1977
17 Volume 42, 1978
134 Adirondac
1 Volume 43, 1979
2 Volume 44, 1980
3 Volume 45, 1981
4 Volume 46, nos. 1-5 1982
5 Volume 46, nos. 6-10, 1982
6 Volume 47, nos. 1-5, 1983
7 Volume 47, nos. 6-10, 1983
8 Volume 48, nos. 1-5, 1984
9 Volume 48, nos. 6-10, 1984
135 Adirondac
1 Volume 49, (1-5), 1985
2 Volume 49, (6-10), 1985
3 Volume 50, (1-5), 1986
4 Volume 50, (6-10), 1986
5 Volume 51, (1-5), 1987
6 Volume 51, (6-10), 1987
7 Volume 52, (1-5), 1988
8 Volume 52, (6-10), 1988
9 Volume 53, (1-5), 1989
10 Volume 53, (6-10), 1989
136 Adirondac
1 Volume 54, (1-4), 1990
2 Volume 54, (5-8), 1990
3 Volume 55, (1-3), 1991
4 Volume 55, (4-6), 1991
137 Cloud Splitter
1 Volume 1, 1938
2 Volume 2, (1-4), 1939
3 Volume 2, (5-8), 1939
4 Volume 3, (1-4), 1940
5 Volume 3, (5-8), 1940
6 Volume 4, (1-5), 1941
7 Volume 4, (6-9), 1941
8 Volume 5, (1-4), 1942
9 Volume 5, (5-9), 1942
138 Cloud Splitter
1 Volume 6, (1-5), 1943
2 Volume 6, (6-9), 1943
3 Volume 7, (1-3), 1944
4 Volume 7, (4-6), 1944
5 Volume 8, (1-3), 1945
6 Volume 8, (4-6), 1945
7 Volume 9, (1-3), 1946
8 Volume 9, (4-6), 1946
9 Volume 10, (1-3), 1947
10 Volume 10, (4-6), 1947
11 Volume 11, (1-3), 1948
12 Volume 11, (4-6), 1948
139 Cloud Splitter
1 Volume 12, (1-3), 1949
2 Volume 12, (4-6), 1949
3 Volume 13, (1-3), 1950
4 Volume 13, (4-6), 1950
5 Volume 14, (1-3), 1951
6 Volume 14, (4-6), 1951
7 Volume 15, (1-3), 1952
8 Volume 15, (4-6), 1952
9 Volume 16, (1-3), 1953
10 Volume 16, (4-6), 1953
11 Volume 17, (1-3), 1954
12 Volume 17, (4-6), 1954
140 Cloud Splitter
1 Volume 18, (1-3), 1955
2 Volume 18, (4-6), 1955
3 Volume 19, (1-3), 1956
4 Volume 19, (4-6), 1956
5 Volume 20, (1-3), 1957
6 Volume 20, (4-6), 1957
7 Volume 21, (1-3), 1958
8 Volume 21, (4-6), 1958
9 Volume 22, (1-3), 1959
10 Volume 22, (4-6), 1959
11 Volume 23, (1-3), 1960
12 Volume 23, (4-6), 1960
141 Cloud Splitter
1 Volume 24, (1-6), 1961
2 Volume 25, (1-6), 1962
3 Volume 26, (1-6), 1963
4 Volume 27, (1-6), 1964
5 Volume 28, (1-6), 1965
6 Volume 29, (1-6), 1966
7 Volume 30, (1-6), 1967
8 Volume 31, (1-6), 1968
142 Cloud Splitter
1 Volume 32, (1-4), 1969
2 Volume 33, (1-4), 1970
3 Volume 34, (1-5), 1971
4 Volume 35, (1-5), 1972
5 Volume 36, (1-3), 1973
6 Volume 36, (4-6), 1973
7 Volume 37, (1-4), 1974
8 Volume 38, (1-4), 1975
9 Volume 39, (1-4), 1976
143 Cloud Splitter
1 Volume 40, (1-4), 1977
2 Volume 41, (1-2), 1978*
3 Volume 42, (1-4), 1979
4 Volume 43, (1, 3, 4), 1980
5 Volume 44, (1, 3, 4), 1981
6 Volume 45, (1-2), 1982
7 Volume 45, (3-4), 1982
8 Volume 46, (1-2), 1983
9 Volume 46, (3-4), 1983
10 Volume 47, (1-2), 1984
11 Volume 47, (3-4), 1984
144 Cloud Splitter
1 Volume 48, (1-2), 1985
2 Volume 48, (3-4), 1985
3 Volume 49, (3), 1986
4 Volume 50, (1-2), 1987
5 Volume 50, (3-4), 1987
6 Volume 51, (1-3), 1988
145 Newsclippings Files
1-3 ADK Activities and Events, 1922-1982
4 Conservation/Environmental Issues, 1960’s.
5 Forest Preserve National Park Proposal, 1967
6 Gooley Dam, 1966-1970
7-8 APA Land Master Plan Formation, 1970-1973
9 APA Policy Enactment and Reaction, 1975-1980
10 APA Policies, 1980’s
11 Adirondack Conservancy, 1975-1977
12 Winter Olympics Environmental Impact, 1977-1978
13 Adirondack Forest Preserve Centennial, 1985
14 Artists and Writers Profiles
15 History
16-17 Hiking and Climbing
18 Natural History
19 Search and Rescue
20 Ski Touring
21 Winter Mountaineering
22-24 Miscellaneous
146 Adirondack Loj Chapter Records, 1959-1968
Minutes, 1959-1962
1 1959-1960
2 1961-1962
Monthly Reports, 1959-1967
3 1959-1960
4 1961-1962
5 1962-1963
6 1963-1964
7 1964-1966
8 1966-1968
General Correspondence
9 1959
10 1960
11 1962
12 1963
13 1964 (January-August)
14 1964 (September) – 1965
147 Adirondack Loj Chapter Records, 1959-1968 (Cont.)
General Correspondence, 1954-1967 (Cont.)
1 1966 (January-August)
2 1966 (September)-1967
Chapter Secretary Correspondence, 1959-1968
3 1959-1960
4 1961-1962
5 1962-1965
6 1964-1967
7 1967-1968
8 Executive Secretary Correspondence, 1961-1962
Membership Correspondence
9 1959
10 1960
11 1961-1962
12 1964-1967
13 Contributions, 1961-1962
148 Glens Falls Chapter Records, 1950-1980
Proceedings, 1950-1980
1 1900-1950
2 1950-1964
3 1965-1967
4 1968-1969
5 1970
6 1971
7 1974-1976
8 1977-1978
9 1979-1980
149 Albany Chapter Records, 1922-1995
1 Annual Meeting Minutes and Reports, 1922-1929
Annual Reports
2 1930-1939
3 1940-1952
4 1952-1955
5 1955-1959
6 Annual Meeting Minutes, 1944-1948
Minute Books, 1939-1950
7-9 Book I: 3/7/1939-11/2/1975
10 Book II: 2/2/1952-3/10/1953
11-13 Book III: 10/1/1954-4/7/1957
Minute Books, 1939-1950 (Cont.)
14 Book IV: 4/9/1957-12/5/1958
15 Book V: 12/9/1958-6/9/1959
150 Albany Chapter Records, 1922-1975 (Cont.)
Minutes and Reports, 1959-1995
1 9/1959-6/1960
2 10/1960-6/1961
3 10/1961-6/1962
4 10/1962-6/1963
5 10/1963-6/1965
6 10/1965-6/1966
7 10/1966-6/1967
8 10/1967-6/1968
9 10/1968-6/1969
10 10/1969-6/1970
11 10/1970-6/1971
12 10/1971-6/1972
13 9/1972-12/1972
14 1/1973-6/1973
151 Albany Chapter Records, 1922-1975 (Cont.)
Minutes and Reports, 1959-1995 (Cont.)
1-2 10/1973-6/1974
3 10/1974-6/1975
4 10/1975-6/1976
5 10/1976-6/1977
6 10/1977-6/1978
7 10/1978-6/1979
8 10/1979-6/1980
9-10 10/1980-6/1981
11-12 10/1981-6/1982
13 10/1982-6/1983
14 9/1983-6/1984
15 9/1984-6/1985
16 10/1985-6/1986
152 Albany Chapter Records, 1922-1995 (Cont.)
Minutes and Reports, 1954-1995 (Cont.)
1 9/1986-6/1987
2 9/1987-6/1988
3 9/1988-6/1989
4 9/1989-6/1990
5 9/1990-6/1991
6 9/1991-6/1992
7 9/1992-6/1993
8 9/1993-6/1994
9 9/1994-6/1995
10-12 Correspondence and Memorandum, 1986-1987
153 ADK Publications
Guide to Adirondack Trails. High Peaks and Northville-Placid
Trail. 7th ed. 1962. 8th ed. 1973. 9th ed. 1977. 10th ed. 1980.
Guide to Trails of the West Central Adirondacks. Robert J.
Redington. 1980.
154 ADK Publications
Guide to Adirondack Trails. (Forest Preserve Series)
1st. 1985. 2nd 1992-1994.
V. I. High Peaks Region. Tony Goodwin. 1985, 1992.
V. II. Northern Region. Peter O’Shea. 1986, 1993.
V. III. Central Region. Bruce C. Wadsworth. 1986, 1994.
V. IV. Northville-Placid Trail. Bruce C. Wadsworth. 1986, 1994.
V. V. West Central Region. Arthur W. Haberl. 1994.
V. VI. Eastern Region. Carl Heilman II. 1987, 1994.
V. VII. Southern Region. Linda Laing. 1994.
V. VIII. Catskill Region. Bruce Wadsworth. 1994.
155 ADK Publications
Walks and Waterways. Barbara McMartin Patterson. 1974.
Old Roads and Open Peaks. Barbara McMartin. 1977.
Guide to Northville-Placid Trail. 1980.
Guide to Eastern Adirondacks. Barbara McMartin. 1981.
An Adirondack Sampler. Day Hiker for All Seasons.
Bruce Wadsworth. 1979. (3rd ed. 1992).
An Adirondack Sampler II. Backpacking Trips.
Bruce Wadsworth. 1981.
Geology of the Adirondack High Peaks Region. A Hikers
Guide. Howard and Elizabeth Jaffe. 1986.
Winter Hiking and Camping. John A. Danielson.
1st ed. 1972. 2nd ed. 1977. 3rd ed. 1982.
Northern Adirondack Ski Tours. Tony Goodwin. 1981.
Classic Adirondack Ski Tours. Tony Goodwin. 1994.
The Adirondack Landscape. A Hiker’s Guide.
Jerome Wyckoff. 1967.
A Climber’s Guide to the Adirondacks. Rock and Slide Climbs.
Trudy Healy. 2nd ed. 1971.
Trees of the Adirondack High Peaks Region. A Hiker’s Guide.
E.H. Ketchledge. 1967.
156 ADK Publications
Adirondack Canoe Waters. North Flow. Paul F. Jamieson. 1st ed. 1977. 2nd ed. 1981. 3rd. ed. 1987.
Adirondack Canoe Waters. South and West Flow.
Alec C. Proskine. 1st. ed. 1985. 2nd ed. 1989.
Adirondack Mountain Club Canoe Guide to Western and Central New York State. Mark Freeman. 1994.
Birdlife of the Adirondack Park. Bruce McP. Boehler. 1976.
Adirondack Bibliography. A List of Books, Pamphlets, and Printed Articles through the Year 1955. ADK Bibliography Committee. 1st ed. 1958.
157 Adirondack Pilgrimage. Paul F. Jamieson. 1986.
Adirondack Reader. Paul F. Jamieson. 1982.
Peaks and People of the Adirondacks. Russell M.L. Carson. 1927. 1973 reprint.
Tales from the Shawngunk Mountains. Marc B. Fried. 1981.
Our Wilderness: How the people of New York Found, Change
and Preserved the Adirondacks. Michael Steinberg. 1992.
The Forest Preserve of New York State: A Handbook for Conservationists. David L. Newhouse. 1985.
158 ADK Publications (Cont.)
Adirondack Mountain Club Calendar (Cont.)
1983
1984
1985
1987
1988
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995

THE  GRAND  PATROONS  ….   The  SLAVERS  of  ALBANY

The ALBANY  CORPORATION

History of slavery in New York – Wikipedia

Historically, the enslavement of overwhelmingly African people in the United States, began in New York as part of the Dutch slave trade. ….. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation,Inc., a non-profit organization.

[PDF]Historical Research Report Predecessor Institutions … – Citizens Bank

May 25, 2006 – predecessors and the slave trade or slavery which were ….. also reported that he had made loans to two other Jamaican plantations, the New Hope and Albany ….. banking operations from Mellon Financial Corporation.

New York Slavery Records Index – Records of Enslaved Persons and …

Our data come from census records, slave trade transactions, cemetery records, birth certifications, manumissions, ship inventories, newspaper accounts, private …

New Netherland Institute :: Slave Trade

Dutch merchants had established trade relations along the West Central African … but in 1659 a publicslave sale took place in Beverwijck (present-day Albany).

Slavery and Freedom in New York City – Longreads

Apr 30, 2015 – The Dutch dominated the Atlantic slave trade in the early … for any slave found without permission more than forty miles north of Albany. …… With permission of the publisher, W.W. Norton & Company, Inc. All rights reserved.

Liberty, Equality, Power: A History of the American People

John M. Murrin, ‎Paul E. Johnson, ‎James M. McPherson – 2011 – ‎History

It took over Portugal’s slavetrading posts in West Africa and for a while even … The Dutch established Fort Orange (modern Albany) 150 miles upriver for trade …

Broken America – Page 65 – Google Books Result

David Cooper – 2006 – ‎Political Science

beings and were not told that it was intended to remove corporations in any … You may remember learning about The Dutch West India Company in eighth … The company built Fort Orange on the site ofAlbany, N.Y. in 1624, Fort … By the end of their existence, in 1791, their primary commerce was the African slave trade.

The  Ancient  ROYAL  background of  the  Pinko  Park  /    Forst  Reserve /   Deer Park  of  ROYAL  DESIGN

The Colvins are a family of ancient English lineage, the first appearance of the name in English history occurring in the old chronicles, wherein it is stated that Colvin, Duke of Col-Chester, or Kaer-Colvin (“Col-chester” equivalent to “Colvin-town”), became King of Britain and rejected the authority of the Roman Emperor. The Roman general, Constantius, being sent against him with an army, a truce was made and Constantius married Helen Colvin, daughter of the king. The son of this union was Constantine, afterwards Emperor of Rome, and called “The Great,” who was the first Christian emperor.* [* See ancient English Chronicles of Britain (Grafton, 1568, p 86-87-88-89), and Peter Heylyn’s great “Cosmographi,” Kings of Britain, p. 273.] His mother, Helen, was the Saint Helena, of the ancient Catholic Church, so honored as the discoverer at Jerusalem of the remains of the “true cross” on which the Savior died, which facts may be found more fully brought out in Geoffrey’s [i.e., Geoffrey of Monmouth] British History, chapter vi., Grafton’s Chronicles; Heylyn Chronicles, p. 273.

John , Andrew  and VerPlank Colvin  the  Grand  Perpetrators  of  New York’s   FABIAN SOCIALIST /   COMMUNAL  /    ROYAL  Racket and Scam

except ….  Ariaantje Coeymans, wife of David Verplanck, was the daughter of Barent Pieterse Coeymans, who purchased the enormous tract bearing his name. He was the son of Pieter Coeymans, also a miller, the progenitor of his family in America, who came from Utrecht in 1636, and he married the daughter of Andries De Vos. Barent, first owner of the mill at Coeymans, had litigation with the Patroon Van Rensselaer, because he had dealings before the Patroon with the native Indians for the tract of land measuring ten or twelve miles along the Hudson river. It was decided in Coeymans’ favor in 1714, and he obtained a patent from Queen Anne confirming the entire tract to him. Upon a commanding site, near the Hudson river, was erected the old stone mansion, the oldest building in the place, and still an object of great interest, once called the “Coeymans’ Castle.”

See  the  Adirondacks  a  Royal Hustle

Queen  Anne  DID NOT   Own  the  Land  is  the  problem

Oh and  the  ROYAL’s  are all COUSINS  You Can’t Make THIS CRAP UP

The Economic Impact of the Adirondack ( Deer Park ) Park Private Land Use and Development Plan

The purpose of this book is to assess the nature and degree of impact the Adirondack Park Private Land Use and Development Plan has had upon the economy of the Adirondack Park Region in New York State. This Plan regulates land use on the private areas within the Adirondack Park “blue line,” lands th…

BOOKS.GOOGLE.COM.PE

AdirondackSCAM

Fabian Society: Pay for Permission to Use the Earth – YouTube

Video for Fabian Society Land Controls
May 21, 2013 – Uploaded by Truthstream Media

http://truthstreammedia.com/fabian-so… In a document from the Fabian Societycirca 1887, the prestigious UK …

 

GREEN  is  the  NEW  RED ( PINK )

The PINK LINE PARKS  OF New York

The 1882  Park Legislation was for less than 600 Thousand  Acres

It’s  EXPLODED to  6  Million  Now

adkmapsm1891

Original 1880s  Adirondack Legislation included less than  600,000 Acres

The  NEW York Fabian Police State has grown it to MORE Than 6,000,000  SIX MILLION ACRES

 

The Vast  Royal Dominion of  NEW  England and the NEW  Netherlands with NEW France

How the ROYALS still control the  NEW FOUND LANDS   even Today …   enjoy the Show

 

The  FABIANS and the  Ultra Left of SAVE The WILD and  Protect the Adirondacks

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